Where the Columbia spring chinook bit best

first_imgClick to enlarge When it comes to fishing in the lower Columbia River, not all areas are equal.Salmon tend to bite better in certain locations than they do in others. We’re not talking here about total catch, but rather catch-per-effort.Total catch is going to be the greatest where there are the most anglers. Catch-per-effort is like a batting average — statistically what your chances are of getting a fish each time you hit the water.The numbers are in for April’s spring chinook fishery in the lower Columbia. The river was open for 13 days in April and the Washington and Oregon departments of Fish and Wildlife generate catch estimates based on their angler sampling programs.Here’s what the numbers tell us. All of this combines hatchery fish kept plus wild fish released to produce a “success rate” percentage:o The best fishing occurred off the Oregon bank in the St. Helens area. It’s not a big secret that guys who fish off Sand Island at St. Helens do well in the spring. The location is just downstream of the mouth of Multnomah Channel, a main travel route the Willamette-origin spring chinook.last_img

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