WiFi signals can see through walls

first_img Explore further More information: Through-Wall Tracking Using Variance-Based Radio Tomography Networks, Joey Wilson, Neal Patwari, arXiv:0909.5417© 2009 PhysOrg.com Image: arXiv:0909.5417. Cognitive radio helps guarantee reachability of emergency services (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers at the University of Utah, USA, have discovered that variations in signal strengths in wireless networks can be used to “see” movements of people on the other side of walls or doors.center_img The scientists, Joey Wilson and Neal Patwari, detected movements by measuring the signal strength of the radio waves between the nodes of wireless network devices. The presence of people moving through the field is registered as a change in signal strength. The space is interrogated by many signals that are picked up by many receivers, and this allows a picture of the movement in the space to be built up. The technique is called variance-based radio tomographic imaging.Wilson and Patwari set up a 34-node network outside a living room in a house to test the system, and were able to detect movements to about three feet through the wall. At present the scientists are only able to detect movements, and are not yet able to generate images, but they are sure this will be possible in the future. They are equally confident they will be able to improve accuracy, even with fewer nodes. They also say that adding GPS to each node would enable it to work out its own location, and this should improve the imaging process.The researchers expect the system to find application in search and rescue operations, such as finding people trapped under collapsed buildings after earthquakes. The scientists envisage emergency workers using Wi-Fi radio technologies to install a network of sensors around an emergency area to detect the presence of survivors and bodies.According to Wilson and Patwari, the radio sensors could be deployed around a disaster site by the emergency workers, either by dropping them or throwing or launching them in some way. Each sensor would then form part of a network and begin to transmit information about signal strength measurements across the web of sensors to a base station computer. The computer would correlate the information and determine the likely locations of survivors.The advantage of this technique over existing systems capable of sensing what is on the other side of a wall is the price, since the nodes in the network are cheap and off-the shelf. The disadvantage of a cheap and simple system is its potential use as a spy tool by nosy neighbors, peeping toms or burglars, and all the privacy and safety issues such uses raise. Citation: Wi-Fi signals can see through walls (2009, October 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-wi-fi-walls.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

BMW shows handsfree driving on Autobahn w video

first_img Volkswagen announces ‘Temporary Auto Pilot’ with advanced features The video message was that the car was capable of driving on its own in certain circumstances but the driver is the one responsible, and the driver must be able to take over the driving task at all times. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “The car adheres to all traffic laws,” assured the moderator. With the CDC system, the car can brake, accelerate and pass other vehicles while analyzing the traffic conditions. This BMW system uses radar, cameras, laser scanners, and ultrasound distance sensors to get the information it needs.According to BMW the system can also steer the car to pass a slower vehicle. If the car senses there’s a slow mover in front of it, it will search for an open lane where it can safely merge, pass the slow car, and return to the original lane. “Our main challenge was to develop algorithms that can handle entirely new situations. In principle, the system works on all freeways that we have mapped out beforehand with [a] centimeter accuracy,” said Nico Kaempchen, project manager of Highly Automated Driving. at BMW Group Research and Technology. This is no out of the box prototype destined for car showrooms in 2013, however. The video, with its cautious comments about driverless driving and a needed driver, is nowhere near showoff mode as to how the driver can just leave the driving to the vehicle tomorrow. The Autobahn feat was to show a system that might be available ten to 15 years from now, or, as the BMW put it, a “technology study” for use in advancing existing technologies.Overall, the European vendor approach in self-driving cars is not an aggressive play for headlines but rather a promotion of “driver-assistance” technologies that will incrementally lead to more and more driving automation.Driverless technology, say industry observers, will first show its face as a luxury option for high end cars before settling into the mainstream marketplace.Auto makers are selling cars with adaptive cruise control which applies the brakes during highway driving if traffic slows. BMW, according to Technology Review, will work on that kind of capability in its upcoming i3 series of electric cars. The company will offer a “traffic-jam feature” that allows the car to speed up, slow down, and steer on its own at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour, as long as the driver leaves a hand on the wheel. Explore furthercenter_img Citation: BMW shows hands-free driving on Autobahn (w/ video) (2012, January 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-bmw-hands-free-autobahn-video.html (PhysOrg.com) — Move over, Google, or better still, stay off the Autobahn, best not to interfere with the main show, which now stars BMW and its technology feats with self-driving cars. BMW has been drawing press interest in its recent show of what will be possible in self-driving cars 10 to 15 years from now. BMW had announced in August its “ConnectedDrive Connect (CDC) system. This week, a video was released showing a BMW on CDC realtime. BMW put it on the Autobahn, along with a human driver who nonetheless kept hands off the wheel of the car, a BMW 5 series model. © 2011 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Researchers build two versions of new most accurate clock ever

first_img © 2013 Phys.org Explore further (A) Laser light at 578 nm is pre-stabilized to an isolated, high-finesse optical cavity using Pound-Drever-Hall detection and employing electronic feedback to an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and laser piezoelectric-transducer. This stable laser light is then delivered to the Yb-1 and Yb-2 systems, where it is aligned along the optical lattice axis to probe the atomic clock transition. Resonance with the atomic transition is detected by observing atomic fluorescence collected onto a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The fluorescence signal is digitized and processed by a microcontroller unit (MCU), which computes a correction frequency, f1;2(t). This correction frequency is applied to the relevant AOM by way of a direct digital synthesizer (DDS), and locks the laser frequency onto resonance with the clock transition. (B) Relevant Yb atomic energy levels and transitions, including laser cooling transitions (399 and 556 nm), the clock transition (578 nm), and the optical pumping transition used for excited state detection (1388 nm). (C) A single-scan, normalized excitation spectrum of the 1S0- 3P0 clock transition in 171Yb with 140 ms Rabi spectroscopy time; the red line is a free-parameter sinc2 function fit. Credit: arXiv:1305.5869 [physics.atom-ph] Citation: Researchers build two versions of new most accurate clock ever (2013, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-versions-accurate-clock.html (Phys.org) —Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder Colorado have succeeded in building a record breaking clock—one that has an instability of just one part in 10-18. They describe their new clock in a paper they’ve uploaded to the preprint server arXiv. In it they suggest that if their clock could somehow be used to gauge the age of the universe, it would be able to do so within just a single second. More information: An atomic clock with $10^{-18}$ instability, arXiv:1305.5869 [physics.atom-ph] arxiv.org/abs/1305.5869AbstractAtomic clocks have been transformational in science and technology, leading to innovations such as global positioning, advanced communications, and tests of fundamental constant variation. Next-generation optical atomic clocks can extend the capability of these timekeepers, where researchers have long aspired toward measurement precision at 1 part in $bm{10^{18}}$. This milestone will enable a second revolution of new timing applications such as relativistic geodesy, enhanced Earth- and space-based navigation and telescopy, and new tests on physics beyond the Standard Model. Here, we describe the development and operation of two optical lattice clocks, both utilizing spin-polarized, ultracold atomic ytterbium. A measurement comparing these systems demonstrates an unprecedented atomic clock instability of $bm{1.6times 10^{-18}}$ after only $bm{7}$ hours of averaging.via Arxiv Blogcenter_img Journal information: arXiv As time has passed, clock-making has become more important—besides helping people get together at prearranged times, clocks now help run the GPS system, keep networks on track and are key to unlocking the fundamental laws of the universe. As technology has grown in sophistication, so too has the need for ever more accurate clocks. This has led to atomic clocks which use the electronic transition frequency in the ultraviolet, optical or microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum to keep very accurate time. In this new effort, the researchers built a new type of atomic clock that is more accurate than any that has come before.To build their clock the researchers employed a laser and mirrors to build a lattice trap capable of capturing atoms—its purpose was to hold atoms steady so that there wouldn’t be any frequency interference, a problem with other atomic clocks. The trap was then filled with ytterbium atoms which were then shot with a second laser to measure their electronic frequencies. The result was a clock that if allowed, would be off by less than a second if run for 31 billion years.Building a clock that is believed to be the most accurate in the world creates a problem though, how to accurately measure its accuracy? The answer is by building another clock exactly like the first of course and then comparing the two against one another. That’s what the researchers did, running both clocks for a short period to see if they came up with exactly the same time duration, which the researchers report, they did.One of the first uses for the new clock will be in measuring gravitational redshift, which is a means of measuring very precisely, the height of geographic areas. This can be done because time moves slower in areas of higher gravity. The researchers say their new clock is capable of measuring redshit to within 1 centimeter. Physicists propose a way to make atomic clocks more accurate This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers get around bad gap problem with graphene by using negative differential

first_img Journal information: arXiv © 2013 Phys.org Graphene-based transistor seen as candidate for post-CMOS technology More information: Graphene-Based Non-Boolean Logic Circuits, arXiv:1308.2931 [cond-mat.mes-hall] arxiv.org/abs/1308.2931AbstractGraphene revealed a number of unique properties beneficial for electronics. However, graphene does not have an energy band-gap, which presents a serious hurdle for its applications in digital logic gates. The efforts to induce a band-gap in graphene via quantum confinement or surface functionalization have not resulted in a breakthrough. Here we show that the negative differential resistance experimentally observed in graphene field-effect transistors of “conventional” design allows for construction of viable non-Boolean computational architectures with the gap-less graphene. The negative differential resistance – observed under certain biasing schemes – is an intrinsic property of graphene resulting from its symmetric band structure. Our atomistic modeling shows that the negative differential resistance appears not only in the drift-diffusion regime but also in the ballistic regime at the nanometer-scale – although the physics changes. The obtained results present a conceptual change in graphene research and indicate an alternative route for graphene’s applications in information processing.via Arxiv blog As most everyone knows, using silicon as the basis for building transistors is reaching its logical conclusion—basic physics dictates that transistors based on it can only be made so small. Thus, efforts have been underway for several years to find a replacement material. One of the leading candidates, of course, is graphene—it has a variety of properties that would make it ideal, the best of which is the incredible speed in which electrons can move through it. Unfortunately, graphene is not a semiconducting material—it has no bad gap. That makes it useless as material for use in a transistor, which by its very nature must have a component that turns on and off. Graphene stays on all the time.Researchers have spent a lot of time, money and effort trying to force graphene to behave like a semiconductor, but most efforts have either failed completely, or resulted in a slowdown of the movement of electrons—defeating the whole point of using grahene in the first now. Now, however, it appears the team at UC has found a way to use graphene in a transistor, without forcing it to have a band gap.The researchers took advantage of a property of graphene known as negative differential resistance—this occurs when a charge is applied under certain conditions to a material and the overall voltage level of the circuit is reduced. Thus, instead of changing the way graphene behaves, the team found a way to use another of its properties. They used the drop in voltage as a logic gate, which of course is one of the basic components of a transistor.The team hasn’t built an actual transistor yet, but express optimism that it can be done. If they succeed, it could mean the creation of transistors that operate in the 400GHz range—orders of magnitude faster than today’s silicon based technology, though they wouldn’t appear in consumer products for at least ten years due to the need to completely change production processes. Explore furthercenter_img Experimentally observed negative differential resistance characteristics in graphene devices. (a) SEM of top-view SEM of a typical dual-gate graphene device. Gold color is the source/drain, pink color is the top gate and the blue color underneath is graphene flake. The gate and graphene channel is separated by a two-layer of AlOx and HfO2 oxide stack. The scale bar is 1μm. (b) The transfer characteristics of BLG device under different back-gate voltage. The increased resistance at large back-gate voltage indicated band gap opening by perpendicular electric field. The inset shows the Dirac point shift as the back-gate voltage changes. Credit: arXiv:1308.2931 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at the University of California has come up with a way to use graphene in a transistor without sacrificing speed. In a paper they’ve uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, the team describes how they took advantage of a property of graphene known as negative differential resistance to coax transistor-like properties out of graphene without causing it to behave as a semiconductor. Citation: Researchers get around bad gap problem with graphene by using negative differential resistance (2013, August 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-08-bad-gap-problem-graphene-negative.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Printing liquid metals in threedimensional structures

first_img © 2019 Science X Network Reconfiguration of EGaIn printed in the work. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties Using the 3-D printing technique to reconfigure a square coil antenna. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 The electrical contact of direct-printed and reconfigured liquid metals. (A) Schematic illustrations of direct printing (left) and reconfiguration (right). (B) Dependence of total resistance on the length of the channel. Error bars represent the SD. (C) Current-voltage characteristics between Ag pads and direct-printed EGaIn. (D) Current-voltage characteristics between Ag pads and reconfigured EGaIn. (E and F) SEM images of EGaIn on an Ag pad after 7 hours of direct printing. (G and H) SEM images of EGaIn after 7 hours of reconfiguration. Scale bars, 200 μm. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 They performed reconfigurations many times to generate a thin oxide interface and preserve electrical properties of the material under ambient conditions. The free-standing features could be encapsulated in stretchable, conformal configurations. Park et al. demonstrated applications in the form of reconfigurable antenna, tunable by changing geometries and reversibly movable interconnections to use the constructs as mechanical switches. The free-standing 3-D structures were advantageous to minimize the number and space between interconnections for higher integration, as seen with microLED arrays. The results are now published on Science Advances. Advanced technologies that form 3-D conductive structures with high-resolution, high aspect ratios and minimal error of displacement are important to increase device integrity. Device deformability is a key consideration for free-form electronics, including stretchable electronics, wearable electronics, soft actuators and robotics. These electronic devices typically require conformation with movable, arbitrary shapes such as joints or arms, or the soft surfaces of living organisms. Realizing such stretchable devices with conventional materials such as silicon are a challenge due to their brittleness. Materials scientists have therefore developed diverse conductive materials with excellent stretchability in the form of wavy thin metals, metallic networks and elastomeric composites, yet these processes are unable to form scalable 3-D structures. In addition, 3-D printed, and thermally annealed metals are relatively stiff and rigid causing damage to soft, tissue-like substrates. In the experimental setup, Park et al. connected a nozzle to an ink reservoir or pressure controller. The materials scientists used EGaIn (75.5 percent gallium and 24.5 percent indium alloy by weight) as the ink and controlled the distance between the nozzle tip and polymer substrate to deliver the ink. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), they viewed the EGaIn pattern printed with complex 2-D and 3-D geometries and used the technique to print more diverse patterns such as interconnects of electric circuits with high resolution. Explore further LEFT: 3D reconfiguration of liquid metals for electronics. (A) Schematic illustrations of the reconfigurable antenna. (B) Schematic illustrations of two concentric antennas (top) and the SEM image of the disconnected region (bottom). Scale bar, 300 μm. (C) Schematic illustrations of two concentric antennas that are electrically connected (top) and the SEM image of connected lines by reconfiguration (bottom). Scale bar, 300 μm. (D) Measured scattering parameters of the printed antenna in disconnected and connected states. (E) Schematic illustrations of the reconfiguration process for dynamic switching of LEDs. (F) Colorized SEM image of three LED pixels and EGaIn interconnects. The red, green, blue, and yellow colors correspond to red, green, and blue LEDs and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 1 mm. (G) Photograph of three LED pixels and EGaIn interconnects. Scale bar, 1 mm. (H) Schematic illustrations of reconfiguration and photographs of LED working. Scale bars, 5 mm. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). RIGHT: MicroLED array with 3D liquid metal interconnects. (A) Schematic illustration of the microLED array with reconfigured 3D interconnects. (B) Colorized SEM image of the microLED array and EGaIn interconnects. Blue and yellow colors correspond to microLED and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 300 μm. (C) Colorized SEM image of 3D interconnects. The blue and yellow colors correspond to the microLED and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 300 μm. (D) Photographs of light emission of the microLED array. Scale bars, 1 cm. (E) Current-voltage characteristics of microLED with reconfigured interconnects under flat or bent condition. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Journal information: Science Advances Comparatively, liquid metals such as eutectic gallium-indium alloy (EGaIn) or gallium-indium-tin alloy (Galinstan) are intrinsically stretchable, with low toxicity and minimal volatility for superb electrical conductivity—comparable to solid metals. Direct ink printing with a nozzle can form free-standing 3-D structures at room temperature by stacking droplets of liquid metal upon one another but the resulting resolution is not suited to build electronic devices. In the present work therefore, Park et al. report a high-resolution printing method with liquid metal for its direct reconfiguration into 3-D electrode patterns through a nozzle, under ambient conditions. When they applied DC or AC bias to monitor electrical breakdown, the temperature too increased in the experimental setup affecting the mechanical stability of the EGaIn 3-D features. The constructs maintained their initial free-standing 3-D structure without structural collapse at 5000C for 30 minutes. After repeated heating and cooling at room temperature, the oxide skin of the 3-D feature slightly wrinkled due to thermal expansion between the oxide shell and EGaIn core. Park et al. tested the electrical contact of direct-printed and reconfigured liquid metals and measured the dependence of total resistance on the length of the printed channel to show that the resistance of EGaIn patterns significantly increased with time under ambient conditions. As a proof-of-principle of the reconfigurable electronics developed in the present work, Park et al. demonstrated the formation of a reconfigurable antenna with ability to modify its resonance frequency and radiation properties by changing its geometry. For this, the scientists formed a dual coil antenna structure on a glass slide by directly printing EGaIn. During reconfiguration, EGaIn formed a 3-D bridged interconnect, whose resonance frequency the scientists first determined, followed by their use to selectively operate three different light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with red, green and blue light emissions. The reconfigurable, free-standing interconnect maintained its resistance to reliably operate all LEDs at 3V during repeated detachment and connection of multiple reconfiguration steps. The free-standing 3-D interconnects formed using the process of reconfiguration were advantageous to build cross-geometries in a single XY plane, instead of using multiple layers to thereby prevent unwanted electric contact. For this, Park et al. demonstrated both transverse and longitudinal interconnects of EGaIn for a 4 x 4 array of microLEDs on a flexible polymer film to prevent short circuiting. Using the method, Park et al. minimized the number of interconnections integrated in a miniature device, as the 3-D pattern could efficiently minimize the number and space of interconnections. In this way, Young-Geun Park and co-workers demonstrated high-resolution 3-D printing using liquid metal and showed its application for stretchable 3-D integrations that are difficult to achieve with conventional engineering. Compared to existing 3-D printing techniques, this method can form fine, free-standing 3-D structures of electrodes with reconfigurable patterns. As an example, Park et al. engineered a reconfigurable antenna capable of modifying its resonance frequency via geometric changes. They also presented reversibly movable 3-D interconnections as mechanical switches that could facilitate higher compact integration in miniaturized devices. The scientists expect the high-resolution 3-D reconfiguration method to offer a promising new additive manufacturing strategy for highly integrated and stretchable next-generation electronic devices. More information: Young-Geun Park et al. High-resolution, reconfigurable printing of liquid metals with three-dimensional structures, Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 B. Y. Ahn et al. Omnidirectional Printing of Flexible, Stretchable, and Spanning Silver Microelectrodes, Science (2009). DOI: 10.1126/science.1168375 Sihong Wang et al. Skin electronics from scalable fabrication of an intrinsically stretchable transistor array, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/nature25494 , Nature In a recent study on materials science and nanomedicine, Young-Geun Park and co-workers at the departments of Nanoscience, Nanomedicine and Materials Science and Engineering in the Republic of Korea developed an unconventional 3-D printing approach. The scientists engineered a high-resolution, reconfigurable 3-D printing strategy using liquid metals to form stretchable, 3-D constructs. Using the technique, they formed a minimum line width of 1.9 µm using direct printing and printed patterns for reconfiguration in to diverse 3-D structures while maintaining pristine resolutions. High-resolution printing of liquid metals. (A) Schematic illustration of a printing system. (B) SEM image of 2D and 3D high-resolution EGaIn patterns. Scale bar, 100 μm. Inset: Magnified SEM image of the 3D structures. Scale bar, 100 μm. (C) AFM image and cross-sectional profile of printed EGaIn line. Scale bar, 2 μm. (D) SEM image of 1.9-μm-wide EGaIn patterns. Scale bar, 10 μm. (E) SEM image of 3D patterns of EGaIn on a PET film and epoxy (SU-8). Scale bar, 10 μm. (F) Photograph of printed high-resolution EGaIn patterns in (B). Scale bar, 1 cm. (G) Photograph of interconnect patterns of EGaIn. Inset: Top-view photograph. Scale bars, 5 mm. (H) Optical micrographs of printed EGaIn lines according to printing velocities. Scale bar, 40 μm. (I) The plot of line widths versus printing velocities. (J) The plot of line widths versus inner diameters of nozzles. Error bars in (I) and (J) indicate the SD. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Citation: Printing liquid metals in three-dimensional structures (2019, June 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-liquid-metals-three-dimensional.html , Science After directly printing EGaIn through a nozzle, the scientists lifted the nozzle tip for its relocation to the desired position of the substrate to continue printing. The fracture energy of the oxide skin connected the nozzle tip as a “rope” during lift-off. Park et al. measured the maximum velocities for different diameters of filaments to demonstrate different examples and formed 2-D and 3-D features with repeatable reconfiguration. During the process of reconfiguration, the scientists could lift-off a preprinted filament upright from a substrate without fracturing the construct. The observed stable electrodes could withstand electrical load to become increasingly integrated and miniaturized in electric devices. To verify the suitability of EGaIn electrodes as interconnects, Park et al. conducted electrical breakdown tests thereafter. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Paint the town

first_imgArt scene is certainly looking up in Noida and one can say this with conviction considering the kind of art shows that are taking place in this NCR region. Artists from all over the country and around the world are flocking to showcase their works in the month-long show titled Moments Preserved. The group art show by fourteen artists has given space to promising and established artists.Some of the senior artists worth mentioning are Sher Singh Kukkal, Premila Singh, Sangeeta Singh and Chitra Singh. Garima Singh, Shivani Sharma, Geetika Singh Pathania, Meenakshi, Nishi Nitya, Pooja S.I. and Watinungsang Longkumer Some of the senior artists like Premila Singh have immortalised ? the time they spent in South Africa, in their art works. There is a distinct flavour of South African terrain and the sapphire skies. Then there is Garima Singh, who lived in Australia, and portrays an obvious influence of Australian folk and tribal art in her paintings depicting a wide range of flowers and fauna. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’To keep the art scene enthused? the show was inaugurated at Art Life Gallery in Noida on Friday, November 21, by renowned entrepreneur and educationist Sushma Paul Berlia, who is ?also a patron of art. The show is on till December 22, and there are around 100 paintings on display. These include watercolour, acrylic, multimedia and charcoal on paper. The primary aim of holding such shows is to promote art in Noida, which needs to develop as an art hub. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixMost of the artists feel that the satellite town has failed to promote art due to lack of support from the authorities and public alike. “An artist lives in moments and for him, every painting is a milestone in his journey of art,” says Pratibha Agarwal, co-promoter of the gallery. She says, “We are trying to make this journey easier by encouraging upcoming artists and honoring the established ones. Noida has a conspicuous lack of art galleries and artists actually do not feel at home in the absence of art lovers.” Sushma Berlia, who owns a gallery in Jalandhar agreed that every small city needs galleries which promote promising artist. “They need a platform to showcase their talent and galleries like Art Life go a long way in bringing their talent to the fore” said Berlia. When: On till December 22Where: Art Life Gallery, Noidalast_img read more

Indemnity bonds for better road maintenance

first_imgKolkata: In a bid to ensure better maintenance of roads, agencies that will carry out work like laying of cables or pipelines will have to get engaged into an indemnity bond.An order has been passed for indemnity bond for use of the land of the PWD for laying of optical fibre cable and pipelines. It is learnt that the department has prepared standard format of indemnity bond for use of the land of PWD for carrying the same work.Sources said the agency that will undertake the work will have to “indemnify against all damages and claims, if any, due to digging of trenches for laying of cables or pipelines”. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsIt may be mentioned that the issue related to roads getting damaged within a short period of time for carrying out work like laying of cables and pipelines had cropped in a recent administrative review meeting when Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee was heading different districts.She had directed to take necessary steps so that roads do not get damaged within a short period of time for such reasons.It may be mentioned that the state government invest a huge amount of money for strengthening and repairing roads. After the change of guard in the state in 2011, the Mamata Banerjee government has ensured smooth roads even in the remotest part of the state in the past six-and-a-half-year.Even 3,300 km roads under the jurisdiction of Zila Parishads have also been taken up by the state PWD for its strengthening and widening. Besides construction of the roads, the state government also needs to invest a large amount of money for maintenance of the same. So, in a bid to ensure better maintenance of the roads, the PWD has taken the step.last_img read more

Cong names new heads for minority departments in 12 states

first_imgEffecting a major reshuffle, Congress on Friday appointed new heads for its minority departments in 12 states including key states of Uttar Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Gujarat.An AICC release issued by party general secretary Janardan Dwivedi said that the Congress president Sonia Gandhi has approved the names of MM Shaikh as chairman of the minority department of Maharashtra, Gulab Khan Raima for Gujarat, Siraj Mehandi for Uttar Pradesh, Amjad Khan Pathan for Punjab, Manzoor Ahmed Beg for Uttarakhand, Nizamuddin Qureshi for Rajasthan and Sharik Raees Khan for Chhattisgarh. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIAhmed Ali Khan has been made the chairman of the minority department for Andhra Pradesh, Wajed Ali Choudhary for Assam, Billal Mia for Tripura and Bahauddin Beg for Daman and Diu.Sources said that changes will follow in other states soon as they were long due. It has been found that the department was not at all functional in a number of new states and hence a decision to thoroughly revamp the minority department in all states have been taken. In October last year, the party had appointed Khurshid Ahmed Saiyed, a minority leader from Gujarat as chairman of the AICC minority department replacing Imran Ur Rahman Kidwai, who held the post for more than 8 years. He is considered a Rahul Gandhi pick.last_img read more

Ready for structured debate Maken on Kejriwal challenge

first_imgResponding to AAP chief Arvind Kejriwal’s challenge to BJP’s Kiran Bedi for a public debate, Maken said, “This will be a healthy tradition. I believe a structured debate should take place in a mutually accepted TV channel or agency moderated by a mutually accepted anchor.”Maken, who is also the party’s Campaign Committee Chief, said a debate will enable the leadership of various parties to spell out their vision to the public by answering “difficult questions”.“I think this is the best way for the leadership to answer difficult questions that are raised and spell out their vision to the public in the age of Internet and social media,” he said, adding that at least “2-4 such debates” should be held.Through a tweet, tagging both Kejriwal and Bedi, Maken said, “Great! I am ready for a structured debate. Let the people of Delhi make a comparative assessment.”last_img read more

Hungarian folktales on canvas

first_imgA collection of paintings sketched by a handful of students from different schools across the National Capital Region are being showcased at the Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre (HICC).The paintings based on folktales from Hungary and being showcased in the art gallery is a compilation of those who won the first three prizes in the on-the-spot children’s painting competition hosted by the centre.The competition held last February was the 36th edition of the contest organised by HICC and was based on the theme Hungarian folktales. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’About 120 students aged between 6 years and 16 years from 11 city-based schools took part in the contest.“We use to conduct this painting competition every year, this time the theme of competition was Hungarian folk tales,” Johanna Balchandani, senior cultural advisor at the centre said. “We had prepared a special book in Hindi based on three Hungarian folktales. We distributed the book among the candidates and told them to draw a picture about any characters, plots or any parts of the story, we left the choice to them,” she said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThree different prizes were given for each category, and one Director’s special prize was given to the best painting among all the different sections.The winners of the children’s painting competition were felicitated by Szilveszter Bus, ambassador of Hungary to India and Subir Roy, Art Executive at Shankar international Children’s painting competition on a function held at Janpath premises of HICC . Roy had himself selected the winners of the competition. The theme of last year’s painting competition was gypsies in Hungary. Meanwhile the present exhibition that began on May 26 is scheduled to continue till August 28.last_img read more