My Experience with Twitter So Far

first_imgPeople who put up five, six, 10tweets in a few minutes, all with links to the event they’re at, or worse, totheir promotional stuff, are annoying. I probably couldn’t say what exactlyTwitter is supposed to do, but I can tell you, from my perspective, that’s notit. In December I signed up for Twitter. I’dbeen meaning to do it for a while, but hadn’t, because a) I’m not really anearly adopter and b) I wasn’t sure where another social network fit into myschedule, which already has Facebook,Flickr and mediaPRO. But I believe in Rex Hammock’s philosophy of experimenting innew forms of media, so it had been on my list of things I needed to do. AndI get all the potential value, from both the marketing and journalisticperspectives, among others. The catalyst was a lunch I had withMichael Biggerstaff and Marcus Grimm at NxtbookMedia. They were really into Twitter at the time, and said it was a quickerform of communication than blogging, and that you’re more likely to updatebecause the “tweets” have to be quick hits. Twitter does a spotty jobtechnically. Every few days, a bunch of people report they lost all the tweetsthey posted that day. The noise level is out ofcontrol. It’s not a conversation, it’s a cacophony. It’s like a cocktail partyfrom hell, where everyone is shouting at the same time, and someone also jackedup Led Zeppelin in the other room. If social media is aconversation, it’s barely there on Twitter. People overwhelmingly tweet at eachother. Apparently, conversation is rarely needed or desired. Twitter is,ironically, a one-way communication vehicle in a medium that is supposed to besocial. So I signed up and built a network. Some of the people I follow are reallygood. Dan McCarthy (@danielmccarthy), Jeff Klein (@jeffreysklein), Kurt Andersen(@kbandersen), who does a great job of adding personal but business-relevanttouches), Rachel Sklar (@rachelsklar), and Rex (@r) himself come to mind. So do Ted Bahr (@tedbahr), Eric Gervase(@egervase) and Red 7’s own Loree Stark (@loreestark). Harry McCracken (@harrymccracken),Scott Karp (@scottkarp) and Dylan Stableford (@stableford) are good. Gawker(@gawker) does a great job.FOLIO: (twitter.com/foliomag) and AudienceDevelopment (twitter.com/auddevmag) both signed up recently. Someone asked me last week why ITwitter, and why FOLIO: and Audience Development Twitter, and I said I thoughtthe value was thought leadership, not traffic. If you build a network ofinfluential people, and put out brief and thoughtful tweets (not always linkingto something), there’s real value. I have just under 100 followers and Ifollow about the same amount of people. And here’s the way I feel about Twitterright now: Twitter does a poor jobcontrolling spamming and bogus accounts. If you’re active at all, you get hitwith “follow” requests that are spurious, completely unrelated, sketchy, andyou have to check out the profile to tell what the hell they are. All thesecomplaints aside, I check Twitter several times a day and tweet every day, andas I mentioned, some of the people in my network really get it and bringinsight, perspective and inspiration.last_img read more

Black Panther roars with two Grammy Award wins

first_imgThe film’s chart-topping soundtrack, Black Panther: The Album, was nominated for album of the year, and the single All the Stars, by Kendrick Lamar and SZA, was nominated for record of the year, song of the year and best song written for visual media.The soundtrack was produced by Lamar and includes performances by Lamar, Travis Scott, The Weeknd, 2 Chainz and more.Composer Ludwig Göransson was chatting with Variety when he received the news that he’d won the best score soundtrack for visual media award. 9:15 Tags 32 Photos “(Director) Ryan Coogler, what can I say?” Göransson said. “He’s been one of the most incredible artists I’ve ever worked with, and being a part of this phenomena, one of the most important, unique films of all time is so special.”Göransson didn’t get to accept that award onstage, as it wasn’t presented during the televised ceremony, but he did get to make a speech during the show. He helped accept the song of the year award for Childish Gambino’s This Is America, which he co-produced. Gambino did not attend. Post a comment 0 Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice Congrats Best Rap Performance winner (TIE) – “King’s Dead” @kendricklamar, @jayrock, @1future & @jamesblake AND “Bubblin” @AndersonPaak #GRAMMYs— Recording Academy / GRAMMYs (@RecordingAcad) February 10, 2019center_img How Marvel made ‘Black Panther’ look so amazing Flip through 32 Marvel-ous images from this super exhibit Black Panther Marvel Here’s how to watch the Grammys at 5 p.m. PT Sunday. TV and Movies You’ll hear the sounds of Wakanda forever. Black Panther won two Grammy Awards Sunday night, one for best rap performance and one for best score soundtrack for visual media.The best rap performance award was actually a tie. The Black Panther song King’s Dead, by Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future and James Blake, shared the award with Bubblin, by Anderson Paak. King’s Dead was also up for best rap song, but that award went to Drake’s God’s Plan. Watch #BlackPanther composer @ludwiggoransson find out he won a Grammy https://t.co/tj5TaL5qXz #Grammys pic.twitter.com/mEbpzejfDn— Variety (@Variety) February 10, 2019 Black Panther is up for six Oscars at the Academy Awards on Feb. 24, including best picture and best original music score. And maybe it’s a good sign that it didn’t claim a certain award Sunday night. According to Billboard, no film whose soundtrack has won album of the year has gone on to win best picture.First published Feb. 11 at 3:05 p.m. PTUpdate, 9 p.m.: Adds best rap performance win.last_img read more

Printing liquid metals in threedimensional structures

first_img © 2019 Science X Network Reconfiguration of EGaIn printed in the work. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties Using the 3-D printing technique to reconfigure a square coil antenna. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 The electrical contact of direct-printed and reconfigured liquid metals. (A) Schematic illustrations of direct printing (left) and reconfiguration (right). (B) Dependence of total resistance on the length of the channel. Error bars represent the SD. (C) Current-voltage characteristics between Ag pads and direct-printed EGaIn. (D) Current-voltage characteristics between Ag pads and reconfigured EGaIn. (E and F) SEM images of EGaIn on an Ag pad after 7 hours of direct printing. (G and H) SEM images of EGaIn after 7 hours of reconfiguration. Scale bars, 200 μm. Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 They performed reconfigurations many times to generate a thin oxide interface and preserve electrical properties of the material under ambient conditions. The free-standing features could be encapsulated in stretchable, conformal configurations. Park et al. demonstrated applications in the form of reconfigurable antenna, tunable by changing geometries and reversibly movable interconnections to use the constructs as mechanical switches. The free-standing 3-D structures were advantageous to minimize the number and space between interconnections for higher integration, as seen with microLED arrays. The results are now published on Science Advances. Advanced technologies that form 3-D conductive structures with high-resolution, high aspect ratios and minimal error of displacement are important to increase device integrity. Device deformability is a key consideration for free-form electronics, including stretchable electronics, wearable electronics, soft actuators and robotics. These electronic devices typically require conformation with movable, arbitrary shapes such as joints or arms, or the soft surfaces of living organisms. Realizing such stretchable devices with conventional materials such as silicon are a challenge due to their brittleness. Materials scientists have therefore developed diverse conductive materials with excellent stretchability in the form of wavy thin metals, metallic networks and elastomeric composites, yet these processes are unable to form scalable 3-D structures. In addition, 3-D printed, and thermally annealed metals are relatively stiff and rigid causing damage to soft, tissue-like substrates. In the experimental setup, Park et al. connected a nozzle to an ink reservoir or pressure controller. The materials scientists used EGaIn (75.5 percent gallium and 24.5 percent indium alloy by weight) as the ink and controlled the distance between the nozzle tip and polymer substrate to deliver the ink. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), they viewed the EGaIn pattern printed with complex 2-D and 3-D geometries and used the technique to print more diverse patterns such as interconnects of electric circuits with high resolution. Explore further LEFT: 3D reconfiguration of liquid metals for electronics. (A) Schematic illustrations of the reconfigurable antenna. (B) Schematic illustrations of two concentric antennas (top) and the SEM image of the disconnected region (bottom). Scale bar, 300 μm. (C) Schematic illustrations of two concentric antennas that are electrically connected (top) and the SEM image of connected lines by reconfiguration (bottom). Scale bar, 300 μm. (D) Measured scattering parameters of the printed antenna in disconnected and connected states. (E) Schematic illustrations of the reconfiguration process for dynamic switching of LEDs. (F) Colorized SEM image of three LED pixels and EGaIn interconnects. The red, green, blue, and yellow colors correspond to red, green, and blue LEDs and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 1 mm. (G) Photograph of three LED pixels and EGaIn interconnects. Scale bar, 1 mm. (H) Schematic illustrations of reconfiguration and photographs of LED working. Scale bars, 5 mm. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). RIGHT: MicroLED array with 3D liquid metal interconnects. (A) Schematic illustration of the microLED array with reconfigured 3D interconnects. (B) Colorized SEM image of the microLED array and EGaIn interconnects. Blue and yellow colors correspond to microLED and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 300 μm. (C) Colorized SEM image of 3D interconnects. The blue and yellow colors correspond to the microLED and EGaIn, respectively. Scale bar, 300 μm. (D) Photographs of light emission of the microLED array. Scale bars, 1 cm. (E) Current-voltage characteristics of microLED with reconfigured interconnects under flat or bent condition. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Journal information: Science Advances Comparatively, liquid metals such as eutectic gallium-indium alloy (EGaIn) or gallium-indium-tin alloy (Galinstan) are intrinsically stretchable, with low toxicity and minimal volatility for superb electrical conductivity—comparable to solid metals. Direct ink printing with a nozzle can form free-standing 3-D structures at room temperature by stacking droplets of liquid metal upon one another but the resulting resolution is not suited to build electronic devices. In the present work therefore, Park et al. report a high-resolution printing method with liquid metal for its direct reconfiguration into 3-D electrode patterns through a nozzle, under ambient conditions. When they applied DC or AC bias to monitor electrical breakdown, the temperature too increased in the experimental setup affecting the mechanical stability of the EGaIn 3-D features. The constructs maintained their initial free-standing 3-D structure without structural collapse at 5000C for 30 minutes. After repeated heating and cooling at room temperature, the oxide skin of the 3-D feature slightly wrinkled due to thermal expansion between the oxide shell and EGaIn core. Park et al. tested the electrical contact of direct-printed and reconfigured liquid metals and measured the dependence of total resistance on the length of the printed channel to show that the resistance of EGaIn patterns significantly increased with time under ambient conditions. As a proof-of-principle of the reconfigurable electronics developed in the present work, Park et al. demonstrated the formation of a reconfigurable antenna with ability to modify its resonance frequency and radiation properties by changing its geometry. For this, the scientists formed a dual coil antenna structure on a glass slide by directly printing EGaIn. During reconfiguration, EGaIn formed a 3-D bridged interconnect, whose resonance frequency the scientists first determined, followed by their use to selectively operate three different light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with red, green and blue light emissions. The reconfigurable, free-standing interconnect maintained its resistance to reliably operate all LEDs at 3V during repeated detachment and connection of multiple reconfiguration steps. The free-standing 3-D interconnects formed using the process of reconfiguration were advantageous to build cross-geometries in a single XY plane, instead of using multiple layers to thereby prevent unwanted electric contact. For this, Park et al. demonstrated both transverse and longitudinal interconnects of EGaIn for a 4 x 4 array of microLEDs on a flexible polymer film to prevent short circuiting. Using the method, Park et al. minimized the number of interconnections integrated in a miniature device, as the 3-D pattern could efficiently minimize the number and space of interconnections. In this way, Young-Geun Park and co-workers demonstrated high-resolution 3-D printing using liquid metal and showed its application for stretchable 3-D integrations that are difficult to achieve with conventional engineering. Compared to existing 3-D printing techniques, this method can form fine, free-standing 3-D structures of electrodes with reconfigurable patterns. As an example, Park et al. engineered a reconfigurable antenna capable of modifying its resonance frequency via geometric changes. They also presented reversibly movable 3-D interconnections as mechanical switches that could facilitate higher compact integration in miniaturized devices. The scientists expect the high-resolution 3-D reconfiguration method to offer a promising new additive manufacturing strategy for highly integrated and stretchable next-generation electronic devices. More information: Young-Geun Park et al. High-resolution, reconfigurable printing of liquid metals with three-dimensional structures, Science Advances (2019). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 B. Y. Ahn et al. Omnidirectional Printing of Flexible, Stretchable, and Spanning Silver Microelectrodes, Science (2009). DOI: 10.1126/science.1168375 Sihong Wang et al. Skin electronics from scalable fabrication of an intrinsically stretchable transistor array, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/nature25494 , Nature In a recent study on materials science and nanomedicine, Young-Geun Park and co-workers at the departments of Nanoscience, Nanomedicine and Materials Science and Engineering in the Republic of Korea developed an unconventional 3-D printing approach. The scientists engineered a high-resolution, reconfigurable 3-D printing strategy using liquid metals to form stretchable, 3-D constructs. Using the technique, they formed a minimum line width of 1.9 µm using direct printing and printed patterns for reconfiguration in to diverse 3-D structures while maintaining pristine resolutions. High-resolution printing of liquid metals. (A) Schematic illustration of a printing system. (B) SEM image of 2D and 3D high-resolution EGaIn patterns. Scale bar, 100 μm. Inset: Magnified SEM image of the 3D structures. Scale bar, 100 μm. (C) AFM image and cross-sectional profile of printed EGaIn line. Scale bar, 2 μm. (D) SEM image of 1.9-μm-wide EGaIn patterns. Scale bar, 10 μm. (E) SEM image of 3D patterns of EGaIn on a PET film and epoxy (SU-8). Scale bar, 10 μm. (F) Photograph of printed high-resolution EGaIn patterns in (B). Scale bar, 1 cm. (G) Photograph of interconnect patterns of EGaIn. Inset: Top-view photograph. Scale bars, 5 mm. (H) Optical micrographs of printed EGaIn lines according to printing velocities. Scale bar, 40 μm. (I) The plot of line widths versus printing velocities. (J) The plot of line widths versus inner diameters of nozzles. Error bars in (I) and (J) indicate the SD. (Photo credit: Young-Geun Park, Yonsei University). Credit: Science Advances, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw2844 Citation: Printing liquid metals in three-dimensional structures (2019, June 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-liquid-metals-three-dimensional.html , Science After directly printing EGaIn through a nozzle, the scientists lifted the nozzle tip for its relocation to the desired position of the substrate to continue printing. The fracture energy of the oxide skin connected the nozzle tip as a “rope” during lift-off. Park et al. measured the maximum velocities for different diameters of filaments to demonstrate different examples and formed 2-D and 3-D features with repeatable reconfiguration. During the process of reconfiguration, the scientists could lift-off a preprinted filament upright from a substrate without fracturing the construct. The observed stable electrodes could withstand electrical load to become increasingly integrated and miniaturized in electric devices. To verify the suitability of EGaIn electrodes as interconnects, Park et al. conducted electrical breakdown tests thereafter. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more