VIDEO Analog Devices Holds Science Technology Fair At Wilmington Middle School

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington’s Analog Devices held its 17th Annual Science and Tech Fair at Wilmington Middle School on Friday, April 6 during the school day.Approximately 50 engineers from Analog Devices brought science and technology to life by partnering with students to conduct hands-on experiments. Experiments included electrical wiring, shortwave radios, soldering practice, magnets and electro-magnets, strobe light demonstrations, hands-on shop activities, a Geiger counter demonstration, and a dry-ice demonstration.Students also participated in a fact-finding competition, with prizes awarded to the winners.View highlights from the event and hear from event organizer Chuck Kitchin, courtesy of Wilmington Community Television, below:—Video Playerhttps://objects-us-west-1.dream.io/wilmington/4/e/8/e/a/9/4e8ea9c8-3064-41ba-9d2b-f512ad3c43661523904433.105%2B28687132.148%40castus4-wilmington%2B15239702621523969624006914.vod.720p.Wilmington%20Middle%20School%20Science%20Fair_%20April%206th%2C%202018.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVIDEO: Analog Devices Holds Science & Technology Fair At Wilmington Middle SchoolIn “Videos”Analog Devices To Host Science & Tech Fair At Wilmington Middle School On April 12In “Education”VIDEO: Analog Devices Holds Science & Technology Fair At Wilmington Middle SchoolIn “Videos”last_img read more

PCB chief Ehsan Mani criticises Star Sports for its ads on IndiaPakistan

first_imgPCB chief has expressed his disapproval of the Star Sports ad campaignTwitterThe latest to join the chorus of criticism of advertisements produced by Star Sports to promote their coverage of India vs Pakistan match in the ICC 2019 World Cup on June 16 is the chief of Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) Ehsan Mani. In a statement that takes potshot at the official broadcasters, Mani criticised the sports network for its parochial vision in crafting advertisements and asked the International Cricket Council (ICC) to intervene in the matter.”I think this is for the ICC to take note. Star is the host broadcaster. They are not an Indian broadcaster, they are the broadcaster of the ICC. They should be fair to all teams. That (the teasers) is not part of cricket,” the PCB head remarked.This is not the first time that Star Sports has generated controversy with its promotional campaign. During the last World Cup, while the ‘mauka mauka’ ads were a big hit in India, some people had suggested that they were somewhat offensive to the Pakistanis. A screengrab from the World Cup adYouTube/Star SportsBefore the India-Bangladesh series after the World Cup, the channel again ran an ad campaign that became controversial. The ‘bachche ab bachche nahin rahe’ ads , talking about the Bangladesh team recieved an angry response from the fans of the latter team.Now, in 2019, another controversy has arisen and with political relations between the two countries not in the best of shape, the ads may further sour an already tumultuous relationship. As has been mentioned previously, Star Sports doesn’t have a great recored when it comes to making ads. They are usually over-the-top in their dramatization and hark more on the sentimental aspect rather than the inherent beauty of the sports.But Star isn’t the only company that is, according to some people, crossing the line. Already, Sania Mirza, Indian tennis player and wife of Pakistan cricketer Shoaib Malik has expressed her disapproval of the kind of advertisements being aired on both sides of the border to promote the TV coverage of the match. Let’s see if ICC does something about it.last_img read more

Collision disrupts DhakaCtg rail link

first_img.The rail communications of Chittagong with Dhaka remained cut off following a collision between a Demu train and a truck at Panusua in Comilla sadar upazila.Comilla railway station master Shafiqur Rahman said the accident took place when a sand-laden truck hit the Comilla-bound Demu train at an unauthorised level-crossing around 9:30am on Saturday.Following the collision, the wheels of the train veered off the rail track, said the station master.A Dhaka-bound train, ‘Subarna Express’, got stranded at Comilla rail station following the derailment, reports UNB.A relief train from Akhaura was on its way to the spot to salvage the Demu train, he added.last_img read more

2 killed in road crash

first_imgRoad AccidentA motorcyclist and a pillion rider were killed after a truck hit a motorcycle on the Rajshahi-Chapainawabganj road in Godagari upazila early Thursday, reports UNB.The deceased are identified as Samad, 40, and Alam, 35, of Bidirpur Gongka village in Chapainawabganj sadar upazila.Jahangir Alam, officer-in-charge of Godagari police station, said the accident took place around 12:30am near Godagari Hospital intersection.A goods-laden truck hit the motorbike, killing Alam on the spot and injuring Samad. He was taken to a local hospital where physicians pronounced him dead.The duo was returning home, the OC said.last_img read more

WiFi signals can see through walls

first_img Explore further More information: Through-Wall Tracking Using Variance-Based Radio Tomography Networks, Joey Wilson, Neal Patwari, arXiv:0909.5417© 2009 PhysOrg.com Image: arXiv:0909.5417. Cognitive radio helps guarantee reachability of emergency services (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers at the University of Utah, USA, have discovered that variations in signal strengths in wireless networks can be used to “see” movements of people on the other side of walls or doors.center_img The scientists, Joey Wilson and Neal Patwari, detected movements by measuring the signal strength of the radio waves between the nodes of wireless network devices. The presence of people moving through the field is registered as a change in signal strength. The space is interrogated by many signals that are picked up by many receivers, and this allows a picture of the movement in the space to be built up. The technique is called variance-based radio tomographic imaging.Wilson and Patwari set up a 34-node network outside a living room in a house to test the system, and were able to detect movements to about three feet through the wall. At present the scientists are only able to detect movements, and are not yet able to generate images, but they are sure this will be possible in the future. They are equally confident they will be able to improve accuracy, even with fewer nodes. They also say that adding GPS to each node would enable it to work out its own location, and this should improve the imaging process.The researchers expect the system to find application in search and rescue operations, such as finding people trapped under collapsed buildings after earthquakes. The scientists envisage emergency workers using Wi-Fi radio technologies to install a network of sensors around an emergency area to detect the presence of survivors and bodies.According to Wilson and Patwari, the radio sensors could be deployed around a disaster site by the emergency workers, either by dropping them or throwing or launching them in some way. Each sensor would then form part of a network and begin to transmit information about signal strength measurements across the web of sensors to a base station computer. The computer would correlate the information and determine the likely locations of survivors.The advantage of this technique over existing systems capable of sensing what is on the other side of a wall is the price, since the nodes in the network are cheap and off-the shelf. The disadvantage of a cheap and simple system is its potential use as a spy tool by nosy neighbors, peeping toms or burglars, and all the privacy and safety issues such uses raise. Citation: Wi-Fi signals can see through walls (2009, October 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-10-wi-fi-walls.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more