Gordimer gets Google doodle on 92nd birthday

first_img20 November 2015Nadine Gordimer was “a powerful voice for change in South African politics, (who) moved untold thousands with the pathos of her sparse, penetrating narratives”, Google wrote in its tribute to the writer on its corporate website. Gordimer is the focus of one of its popular doodles to mark her 92nd birthday on 20 November 2015.Gordimer, who died in July 2014, was one of South Africa’s iconic anti-apartheid crusaders. She won the Booker Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature for her epic but thoughtful works that dealt with the moral and racial complexities of South Africa in the 20th century.The doodle features Gordimer labouring in her study, where she typically worked from early morning into the late afternoon, as imagined by artist Lydia Nichols. In a style befitting Gordimer’s prose, Nichols exercised restraint by using only three colours, layered to create texture and subtle variation.Gordimer, who attended just one year of university, was once asked how she had developed such a sophisticated command of the language in the absence of any formal training. “From reading,” she said. “And living, of course.”Source: Googlelast_img read more

2017 Corn Harvest Cab Cam – Brandon Monebrake, Preble County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Ag Net’s Ty Higgins traveled to Preble County to visit with Brandon Monebrake from Petry Farms on their last day of harvest. They talked about how this years corn harvest is going….and going…and going, the performance of the hybrids and varieties he planted this season and what he is thinking of doing in 2018 as he looks at his Brodbeck Seed guide.last_img

Traffic welcomes Ray Allen in Manila

first_imgRead Next LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Alora falls to familiar foe, settles for silver in taekwondo Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games In his post, Allen put some work in, running several miles around Makati. UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension READ: Ray Allen visits Manila“Me and @tyfleming3 ventured into the unknown this morning. We ran through many different neighborhoods often times hoping we were heading in the right direction. The traffic was everywhere!!! #carpediem #tuktuk #manilamiles#runtheworld #runningisfree,” Allen posted on his Instagram account (@trayfour).The 42-year-old Allen flew to Manila from Hong Kong, where he attended a Sneaker Con event.Allen last played for the Miami Heat in the 2014 NBA Finals but only announced his retirement in 2016 in a letter on the Player’s Tribune.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:22Manila police chief: Cops tolerating illegal street vendors to get ax01:18Woman gives birth at Manila North Cemetery on All Souls’ Day01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Welcome to Manila, two-time NBA champion Ray Allen.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutNot the best way to greet a basketball legend but the Philippines gave Allen, who arrived here Tuesday, a first hand look of one of the things Manila is infamously known for.ADVERTISEMENT WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses MOST READ SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa View commentslast_img read more

Rio’s Filthy Waters Await Olympians

first_imgRIO DE JANEIRO — Athletes in next year’s Summer Olympics here will be swimming and boating in waters so contaminated with human feces that they risk becoming violently ill and unable to compete in the games, an Associated Press investigation has found.An AP analysis of water quality revealed dangerously high levels of viruses and bacteria from human sewage in Olympic and Paralympic venues — results that alarmed international experts and dismayed competitors training in Rio, some of whom have already fallen ill with fevers, vomiting and diarrhea.It is the first independent comprehensive testing for both viruses and bacteria at the Olympic sites.Brazilian officials have assured that the water will be safe for the Olympic athletes and the medical director of the International Olympic Committee said all was on track for providing safe competing venues. But neither the government nor the IOC tests for viruses, relying on bacteria testing only.Extreme water pollution is common in Brazil, where the majority of sewage is not treated. Raw waste runs through open-air ditches to streams and rivers that feed the Olympic water sites.As a result, Olympic athletes are almost certain to come into contact with disease-causing viruses that in some tests measured up to 1.7 million times the level of what would be considered hazardous on a Southern California beach.Despite decades of official pledges to clean up the mess, the stench of raw sewage still greets travelers touching down at Rio’s international airport.Prime beaches are deserted because the surf is thick with putrid sludge, and periodic die-offs leave the Olympic lake, Rodrigo de Freitas, littered with rotting fish.“What you have there is basically raw sewage,” said John Griffith, a marine biologist at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project. Griffith examined the protocols, methodology and results of the AP tests.“It’s all the water from the toilets and the showers and whatever people put down their sinks, all mixed up, and it’s going out into the beach waters. Those kinds of things would be shut down immediately if found here,” he said, referring to the U.S.Vera Oliveira, head of water monitoring for Rio’s municipal environmental secretariat, said officials are not testing viral levels at the Olympic lake, the water quality of which is the city’s responsibility.The other Olympic water venues are under the control of the Rio state environmental agency.Leonardo Daemon, coordinator of water quality monitoring for the state’s environmental agency, said officials are strictly following Brazilian regulations on water quality, which are all based on bacteria levels, as are those of almost all nations.“What would be the standard that should be followed for the quantity of virus? Because the presence or absence of virus in the water … needs to have a standard, a limit,” he said. “You don’t have a standard for the quantity of virus in relation to human health when it comes to contact with water.”Olympic hopefuls will be diving into Copacabana’s surf on Aug. 2 during a triathlon Olympic qualifier event, while rowers take to the lake’s water beginning Aug. 5 for the 2015 World Rowing Junior Championships. Test events for sailing and marathon swimming take place later in August.More than 10,000 athletes from 205 nations are expected to compete in next year’s Olympics. Nearly 1,400 of them will be sailing in the waters near Marina da Gloria in Guanabara Bay, swimming off Copacabana beach, and canoeing and rowing on the brackish waters of the Rodrigo de Freitas Lake.The AP commissioned four rounds of testing in each of those three Olympic water venues, and also in the surf off Ipanema Beach, which is popular with tourists but where no events will be held. Thirty-seven samples were checked for three types of human adenovirus, as well as rotavirus, enterovirus and fecal coliforms.The AP viral testing, which will continue in the coming year, found not one water venue safe for swimming or boating, according to global water experts.Instead, the test results found high counts of active and infectious human adenoviruses, which multiply in the intestinal and respiratory tracts of people.These are viruses that are known to cause respiratory and digestive illnesses, including explosive diarrhea and vomiting, but can also lead to more serious heart, brain and other diseases.The concentrations of the viruses in all tests were roughly equivalent to that seen in raw sewage — even at one of the least-polluted areas tested, the Copacabana Beach, where marathon and triathlon swimming will take place and where many of the expected 350,000 foreign tourists may take a dip.“Everybody runs the risk of infection in these polluted waters,” said Dr. Carlos Terra, a hepatologist and head of a Rio-based association of doctors specializing in the research and treatment of liver diseases.Kristina Mena, a U.S. expert in risk assessment for waterborne viruses, examined the AP data and estimated that international athletes at all water venues would have a 99 percent chance of infection if they ingested just three teaspoons of water — though whether a person will fall ill depends on immunity and other factors.Besides swimmers, athletes in sailing, canoeing and to a lesser degree rowing often get drenched when competing, and breathe in mist as well. Viruses can enter the body through the mouth, eyes, any orifice, or even a small cut.The Rodrigo de Freitas Lake, which was largely cleaned up in recent years, was thought be safe for rowers and canoers.Yet AP tests found its waters to be among the most polluted for Olympic sites, with results ranging from 14 million adenoviruses per liter on the low end to 1.7 billion per liter at the high end.By comparison, water quality experts who monitor beaches in Southern California become alarmed if they see viral counts reaching 1,000 per liter.“If I were going to be in the Olympics,” said Griffith, the California water expert, “I would probably go early and get exposed and build up my immunity system to these viruses before I had to compete, because I don’t see how they’re going to solve this sewage problem.”However, Dr. Richard Budgett, the medical director for the International Olympic Committee, said after seeing the AP findings that the IOC and Brazilian authorities should stick to their program of testing only for bacteria to determine whether the water is safe for athletes.“We’ve had reassurances from the World Health Organization and others that there is no significant risk to athlete health,” he told the AP on the sidelines of an IOC meeting in Malaysia.He went on to say that “there will be people pushing for all sorts of other tests, but we follow the expert advice and official advice on how to monitor water effectively.”Many water and health experts in the U.S. and Europe are pushing regulatory agencies to include viral testing in determining water quality because the majority of illnesses from recreational water activities are related to viruses, not bacteria.___A “HUGE RISK” FOR ATHLETESIvan Bulaja, the Croatian-born coach of Austria’s 49er-class sailing team, has seen it firsthand. His sailors have lost valuable training days after falling ill with vomiting and diarrhea.“This is by far the worst water quality we’ve ever seen in our sailing careers,” said Bulaja.Training earlier this month in Guanabara Bay, Austrian sailor David Hussl said he and his teammates take precautions, washing their faces immediately with bottled water when they get splashed by waves and showering the minute they return to shore. And yet Hussl said he’s fallen ill several times.“I’ve had high temperatures and problems with my stomach,” he said. “It’s always one day completely in bed and then usually not sailing for two or three days.”It is a huge risk for the athletes, the coach said.“The Olympic medal is something that you live your life for,” Bulaja said, “and it can really happen that just a few days before the competition you get ill and you’re not able to perform at all.”Dr. Alberto Chebabo, who heads Rio’s Infectious Diseases Society, said the raw sewage has led to “endemic” public health woes among Brazilians, primarily infectious diarrhea in children.By adolescence, he said, people in Rio have been so exposed to the viruses they build up antibodies. But foreign athletes and tourists won’t have that protection.“Somebody who hasn’t been exposed to this lack of sanitation and goes to a polluted beach obviously has a much higher risk of getting infected,” Chebabo said.An estimated 60 percent of Brazilian adults have been exposed to hepatitis A, said Terra, the Rio hepatologist. Doctors urge foreigners heading to Rio, whether athletes or tourists, to be vaccinated against hepatitis A. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recommends travelers to Brazil get vaccinated for typhoid.___UNDER A MICROSCOPEThe AP commissioned Fernando Spilki, a virologist and coordinator of the environmental quality program at Feevale University in southern Brazil, to conduct the water tests.Spilki’s testing looked for three different types of human adenovirus that are typical “markers” of human sewage in Brazil. In addition, he tested for enteroviruses, the most common cause of upper respiratory tract infections in the young. He also searched for signs of rotavirus, the main cause of gastroenteritis globally.The tests so far show that Rio’s waters “are chronically contaminated,” he said. “The quantity of fecal matter entering the waterbodies in Brazil is extremely high. Unfortunately, we have levels comparable to some African nations, to India.”Griffith, the California expert, said the real concern isn’t for what Spilki actually measured, noting that “there are very likely to be nastier bugs in there that weren’t searched for and that are out there lurking.”There is no lack of illness in Rio, but there is a severe shortage of health data related to dirty water, medical experts said.The maladies often hit people hard, but most don’t go see a doctor, so no data is collected.Globally, however, rotavirus accounts for about 2 million hospitalizations and over 450,000 deaths of children worldwide each year, according to the World Health Organization.The AP testing found rotavirus on three separate occasions at Olympic sites — twice at the lake and once at a beach next to the Marina da Gloria, where sailors are expected to launch their boats.Mena, an associate professor of public health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and an expert in water quality, conducted what she called a “conservative” risk assessment for Olympic athletes participating in water sports in Rio, assuming they would ingest 16 milliliters of water, or three teaspoons — far less than athletes themselves say they take in.She found “an infection risk of 99 percent,” she said. “Given those viral concentration levels, do I think somebody should be exposed to those amounts? The answer is no.”The AP also measured fecal coliform bacteria, single-celled organisms that live in the intestines of humans and animals. Fecal coliforms can suggest the presence of cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A and typhoid.In 75 percent of the samples taken at the Olympic lake, the number of fecal coliforms exceeded Brazil’s legal limit for “secondary contact,” such as boating or rowing — in two samples spiking to over 10 times the accepted level.The Marina da Gloria venue exceeded the limit only once, while at Rio’s most popular tourist beach, Ipanema, fecal coliforms tested at three times the acceptable level in a single sample. At Copacabana, the AP tests found no violations of fecal coliform counts.Fecal coliforms have long been used by most governments as a marker to determine whether bodies of water are polluted because they are relatively easy and cheap to test and find. Brazil uses only bacterial testing when determining water quality.In Rio, the fecal coliform levels were not as astronomical as the viral numbers the AP found. That gap is at the heart of a global debate among water experts, many of whom are pushing governments to adopt viral as well as bacterial testing to determine if recreational waters are safe.That’s because fecal coliform bacteria from sewage can survive only a short time in water, especially in the salty and sunny conditions around Rio. Human adenoviruses have been shown to last several months, with some studies even indicating they can last years.That means that even if Rio magically collected and treated all its sewage tomorrow, its waters would stay polluted for a long time.___“A WASTED OPPORTUNITY”In its Olympic bid, Rio officials vowed the games would “regenerate Rio’s magnificent waterways” through a $4 billion government expansion of basic sanitation infrastructure.It was the latest in a long line of promises that have already cost Brazilian taxpayers more than $1 billion — with very little to show for it.Rio’s historic sewage problem spiraled over the past decades as the population exploded, with many of the metropolitan area’s 12 million residents settling in the vast hillside slums that ring the bay.Waste flows into more than 50 streams that empty into the once-crystalline Guanabara Bay. An eye-watering stench emanates from much of the bay and its palm-lined beaches, which were popular swimming spots as late as the 1970s but are now perpetually off-limits for swimmers.Tons of household trash — margarine tubes, deflated soccer balls, waterlogged couches and washing machines — line the shore and form islands of refuse.Starting in 1993, Japan’s international cooperation agency poured hundreds of millions of dollars into a Guanabara cleanup project. The Inter-American Development Bank issued $452 million in loans for more works.A culture of mismanagement stymied any progress. For years, none of four sewage treatment plants built with the Japanese funds operated at full capacity.One of the plants in the gritty Duque de Caxias neighborhood didn’t treat a drop of waste from its construction in 2000 through its inauguration in 2014. For 14 years, it wasn’t connected to the sewage mains.By then, the Japanese agency rated the project as “unsatisfactory,” with “no significant improvements in the water quality of the bay.”As part of its Olympic project, Brazil promised to build eight treatment facilities to filter out much of the sewage and prevent tons of household trash from flowing into the Guanabara Bay. Only one has been built.The fluorescent green lagoons that hug the Olympic Park and which the government’s own data shows are among the most polluted waters in Rio were to be dredged, but the project got hung up in bureaucratic hurdles and has yet to start.“Brazilian authorities promised the moon in order to win their Olympic bid and as usual they’re not making good on those promises,” said Mario Moscatelli, a biologist who has spent 20 years lobbying for a cleanup of Rio’s waterways. “I’m sad but not surprised.”As the clock ticks down, local officials have dialed back their promises. Rio Gov. Luiz Fernando Pezao has acknowledged “there’s not going to be time” to finish the cleanup of the bay ahead of the games.Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes has said it’s a “shame” the Olympic promises wouldn’t be met, adding the games are proving “a wasted opportunity” as far as the waterways are concerned.But the Rio Olympic organizing committee’s website still states that a key legacy of the games will be “the rehabilitation and protection of the area’s environment, particularly its bays and canals” in areas where water sports will take place.___By Brad Brooks and Jenny Barchfield. AP sports writer Stephen Wade and senior producer Yesica Fisch in Rio de Janeiro, and sports writer Stephen Wilson contributed to this report from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia___TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

10 months agoPSG coach Tuchel unsure of future for Barcelona target Rabiot

first_imgPSG coach Tuchel unsure of future for Barcelona target Rabiotby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the lovePSG coach Thomas Tuchel admits Adrien Rabiot’s situation is in flux.The Parisians do not want to lose the 23-year-old and will fight until the end as they look to sign him to a long-term deal, though Rabiot’s agent – his mother Veronique – has reportedly been in Barcelona negotiating a move.”It’s not an easy situation for him,” Tuchel said about Rabiot.”He’s not the first player to have this problem in the dressing room, but he’s still working everyone else and is very professional.”It is what I expect of him and I am sure it will stay like that; we must be [professional], too.”The dressing room knows his situation.”It is a complicated market situation, he is our player and everything can happen.”It is a situation between the club and the player.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Passenger vehicle sales hit speed breaker grow just 27 in FY19

first_imgNew Delhi: Passenger vehicle sales in India rose just 2.7 per cent in 2018-19 as weak customer sentiment led by liquidity crunch, high vehicle prices and uncertainty revolving forthcoming elections put brakes on the sales growth in the segment. According to data released by the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) Monday, domestic passenger vehicles (PV) sales were at 33,77,436 units in 2018-19 beating the previous record of 32,88,581 units in 2017-18. However, despite new product launches, sales failed to revv up during the second half of the last fiscal which had even prompted the industry body to lower the sales forecast for the PVs from the earlier estimate of 8-10 per cent to 6 per cent. The final figure of 2.7 per cent is even lower than that. “If we look at the positive side then we have continued to grow, though not in high single-digit or double-digits, but low single-digit. Also, it is the highest-ever sales and production in a financial year,” SIAM President Rajan Wadhera told reporters here. Domestic car sales in 2018-19 were at 22,18,549 units as against 21,74,024 units in 2017-18, displaying a growth of 2.05 per cent. Utility vehicles (UV) sales were at 9,41,461 units last fiscal as against 9,22,322 units in 2017-18, a growth of 2.08 per cent. However, exports of PVs were down 9.64 per cent at 6,76,193 units in 2018-18 as against 7,48,366 units in 2017-18. “In the year gone by, we faced many challenges. The biggest being high commodity prices during the year which prompted companies to hike vehicle prices which impacted demand. Further issues like compulsory insurance, liquidity crunch at funding companies impacted the sales,” Wadhera said. With the current fiscal lined up with many challenges, including general elections in the first quarter and transition to BS VI-compliant products later during the fiscal, SIAM said it expected PV sales to grow in the range of 3-5 per cent during the current financial year. “We expect some pre-buying to happen before the transition to BS VI emission norms. Hope it leads to some growth. We firmly believe in India growth story,” Wadhera said. When asked if the industry would be able to achieve the target, he added that with the government’s ongoing infrastructure projects and focus on rural areas expected to continue, growth is expected across both urban and rural areas. During 2018-19, market leader Maruti Suzuki India (MSI) sold 17,29,826 units of PVs at a growth of 5.25 per cent. Rival Hyundai Motor India clocked 5,45,243 units, up 1.68 per cent. Homegrown auto major Mahindra & Mahindra’s PV sales were at 2,45,351 units posting a growth of 2.21 units, according to SIAM data. The industry said it expects two-wheeler sales to grow by 5-7 per cent, commercial vehicles by 10-12 per cent and three-wheelers in the range of 7-9 per cent in 2019-20. In 2018-19, two-wheeler sales rose by 4.86 per cent to 2,11,81,390 units as compared with 2,02,00,117 units in 2017-18. Commercial vehicle sales, on the other hand, rose by 17.55 per cent to cross one million sales in a financial year at 10,07,319 units as compared with 8,56,916 units. Sales across categories rose 5.15 per cent to 2,62,67,783 units in 2018-19 from 2,49,81,312 units in 2017-18. In March, PV sales dropped 2.96 per cent, making it the eighth decline in eight months. The sales stood at 2,91,806 units during the month from 3,00,722 units in the year-ago period. Car sales declined 6.87 per cent to 1,77,949 units during the month as compared to 1,91,082 in March 2018 Motorcycle sales last month slipped 14.27 per cent to 9,82,385 units from 11,45,879 units a year earlier. Total two-wheeler sales in March declined 17.31 per cent to 14,40,663 units as compared to 17,42,307 units in the year-ago month. Sales of commercial vehicles were up marginally to 1,09,030 units in March, SIAM said. Vehicle sales across categories registered a decline of 14.21 per cent to 19,08,126 units from 22,24,224 units in March 2018, it added.last_img read more

Metro services affected after electricity connection trips

first_imgKolkata: Metro services were disrupted on Wednesday morning after electricity connection tripped at the Jatin Das Park Metro Station. Since the disruption occurred during peak hours, passengers had to face immense inconvenience reaching their destinations. Services resumed almost after 17 minutes.According to sources, on Wednesday at around 10:40 am, a Dum Dum-bound non- Air Conditioned (AC) rake came to a halt as power supply to it was cut off due to some unknown reason. The motorman tried to start the rake but in vain. Having no other way, the Metro authority cut off the power also to the Kavi Subhas-bound line for necessary repair works. Passengers were also evacuated in the process. Later, engineers of Metro Railway managed to restore the power but what caused the trip is still unknown. Metro authorities stated that at 10.42 am, a non-AC train was held up at Jatin Das Park Metro Station. Power was restored and the train left at 10.59 am. Earlier on Sunday morning, Metro services were disrupted for 10 minutes after water from a sewerage line overflowed and spilt on to the tracks at the Rabindra Sarobar station. According to sources, at around 11:17 am, a Metro rake developed a technical snag and came to a halt just before entering Rabindra Sarobar station. The motorman tried to restart the rake but failed. Immediately, he informed the Metro authorities at the station about the glitch. Within minutes, engineers and other Metro staff went attended to the problem and tried to find out the cause. While doing so, they noticed that the drain located in the middle of the track was filled to the brim. As a result, water had overflowed and reached the track. Immediately, electricity connection to the third rail was cut off and a power block was activated to avoid any untoward incident. After 10 minutes, the track was cleared and power was restored.last_img read more

Nigeria Wildly Celebrates African Cup Soccer Victory

For the last 15 years, Nigeria has wallowed in soccer mediocrity — an ignoble plight for the most populous country on a continent that covets the sport. That changed Sunday when the Super Eagles won the Africa Cup of Nations, defeating Burkina Faso, 1-0.The win touched off an enormous celebration in Lagos, where thousands of delirious fans had gathered to watch the final moments of the tournament at Teslim Balogun Stadium.“We went there, we conquered,” a man who called himself Baba Daniel said to the Associated Press. “We fly; we are an eagle.”Once, Nigeria was a soccer stalwart. However, it turned quickly and badly for the Super Eagles. They have gone 13 years without a victory in the World Cup. It did not even qualify for the 2006 tournament. It was so bad that Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan said he would not allow his country’s national teams to compete because of their substandard results.But FIFA, the sport’s governing body, said it would ban the team over political interference, and Jonathan acquiesced just before the deadline. Then there was a quartet of federation officials charged with corruption after allegations they embezzled money from the team’s tournament funds in South Africa. In short, it was a mess.All that made the win Sunday that much more significant.“President Jonathan urges all Nigerians to imbibe the positive lessons of the Super Eagles’ success because the fulfillment of the country’s immense potentials for greatness will be more speedily attained if more Nigerians resolve to emulate the team’s exemplary unity,” Jonathan said in a statement as Nigeria captured its third African Cup of Nations.“I don’t know how to just express myself,” Daniel said to the AP, “but I’m so flabbergasted. I’m so happy.”The win was a reprieve, if only briefly, from that country’s struggles through a bloody Islamic insurgency, debilitating poverty, sparse electricity and other spirit-stifling challenges.“I’m a proud Nigerian,” fan Cynthia Ejimnkeonye said to the AP. “I love this country with my last blood.” read more

Ohio State track to honor Jesse Owens in last home meet of

Frequent trips to the trio of recreational facilities on campus with Jesse Owens in the title might have led students to forget the significance behind the man who not only left a legacy at Ohio State, but across the United States and the world. This weekend, the OSU Men’s and Women’s Track and Field teams will compete in the Jesse Owens Track Classic, an event that holds a special meaning to the Buckeyes. “This is one of the biggest meets for us,” said senior sprinter Thomas Murdaugh. “It’s something that we all look forward to because it is the Jesse Owens Classic, and to be able to run at the meet dedicated to the greatest athlete of all-time, it’s always a big deal for us.” Owens gained international fame when he became the first American track and field athlete to win four gold medals in a single Olympics during the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. The Jesse Owens Award was named after him to honor his career, and is the highest accolade in U.S. track and field, awarded to the year’s best track and field athlete. But before Owens was an Olympic hero and international track and field icon, he was an OSU student. Owens enrolled at OSU in October of 1933 at the age of 20. In addition to track and classes, he worked part-time as a freight elevator operator at the State House to help pay his tuition. OSU did not offer Owens a scholarship. During the 1930’s, the U.S. was in a state of racial tension, and the OSU community was no exception. Owens was not permitted to live on campus with the white students because of his race; he instead resided off campus with several other African-American students. No restaurant along High Street would serve African-Americans, and when Owens traveled with the team, he often had to eat in separate restaurants. Despite facing segregation and setbacks, Owens proved to be one of the greatest athletes in the history of OSU and the world. On May 25, 1935, during the Big Ten Finals in Ann Arbor, Mich., in what some call the greatest single-day performance in athletic history, Owens accomplished in 45 minutes what some athletes never achieve their entire career: three world records and a tie for a fourth. Men’s interim coach Ed Beathea said the Buckeyes strive to exemplify the university Owens once competed for and think the meet named in his honor is important for his team. “I think this weekend … should remind us of how significant Jesse Owens was and his performances were to track and field, to Ohio State and to the country,” Beathea said. “I think you always feel like you want to go out there and make sure you’re prepared to run your best, and that your efforts are everything that you have, so that you’re a good representation of the place where Jesse Owens ran.” Owens’ life off the track consisted of several business and personal ventures, including travels to India, Philippines, Malaysia and The Ivory Coast, where he lead running clinics and promoted economic and political freedoms of the U.S. Owens was inducted into the U.S. Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1974, and two years later President Gerald Ford presented Owens with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor given by the U.S. government according to OSU archives. Owens died March 31, 1980, at the age of 66. In April 2011, OSU unveiled a statue of Owens at the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium in honor of achievements. Women’s track and field coach Karen Dennis said Owen’s life can send a message not only to athletes, but to all who are inspired by Owen’s story. “I think that he represents the epitome of greatness in track and field; as a human being, his humanity, his unselfishness and as well as his major accomplishments in his track and field. So we are all inspired by Jesse Owens. For our young people to run in the Jesse Owens relays, I think it gives them an opportunity to remember the challenges that he had, as well as how great he became despite challenges,” Dennis said. “I think that’s what we really have to do in athletics is that we have to continue to do our best, no matter what the challenge is that each of us individually face.” The Jesse Owens Classic will kick off competition Friday in the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at 4 p.m. with the women’s javelin and men’s discus. The meet will continue Saturday with events starting at 10:30 a.m. Men’s coach Robert Gary has left the university according to an OSU spokesperson. Beathea will coach the team in his place. read more

Football Tate Martell will not transfer views himself as Ohio States future

PASADENA, Calif. — Redshirt freshman quarterback Tate Martell remembers the quarterback room when offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach Ryan Day first arrived, the four quarterbacks Ohio State had on its roster to choose from: J.T. Barrett, Joe Burrow, Dwayne Haskins and himself. After Barrett left, Martell used both Haskins and Burrow as examples, saying the latter spent one summer with LSU and became its starting quarterback for the 2018 season after his development with the Buckeyes. “It just kind of shows what we had and still have in our quarterback room,” Martell said. Martell believes, like the other three quarterbacks in that particular room, no matter whether it was for Ohio State or not, it’s his turn to add to the legacy of that room after his two seasons of development. Martell said Sunday he will not transfer from Ohio State, even with rumors swirling around the Buckeyes obtaining former five-star quarterback Justin Fields, who announced he would transfer after his first season at Georgia. Day, the incoming Ohio State head coach, would not confirm the speculation, saying the interest level to play at Ohio State, with the help of the performances Haskins has had this season, is as high as he thinks it has ever been. But, to put it simply, Martell is not scared of losing the starting job to Fields. “Why would I leave for someone who hasn’t put in a single second into this program?” Martell said. “I put two years of literally working my ass off into something that I have been waiting for and dreaming of having my whole life. To just run away from somebody who hasn’t put a single second into workouts anything like that and doesn’t know what the program is all about, there’s not a chance.” Martell is not naive. If Haskins departs, there will be one spot in the Ohio State quarterback room for the taking, one alongside Martell, freshman Matthew Baldwin and junior Chris Chugunov. But Martell also knows what situation that particular quarterback, whether its Fields or now, is coming into. “Somebody has to come in and it’s going to take awhile for them to learn the offense. I’m just telling you, it’s not easy. It doesn’t matter where you came from or what you’ve done,” Martell said. “Coach Day brings an NFL-level playbook to our offense and it’s difficult. It’s not something that you can just walk in and three months in, you think that, ‘I’m rolling now.’ It’s not that easy, I promise you.” Many thought, with Martell’s resume coming into Ohio State, starting three seasons at quarterback for Bishop Gorman, going 15-0 as the Gatorade National Player of the Year as a senior, that it would be easy for him to leave, eager to get on the field at the collegiate level as quickly as possible. Martell is that competitor, saying that he wants to get on the field, to show what he can do with the Ohio State offense. However, he said his want and drive to play quarterback for Ohio State, to play for his teammates overpowered all of that. “There’s been times where I’ve had to look at it like how long am I actually going to sit here and wait around before I go and get my chance, but at the end of the day, I had to sit there and the reason why I have never left this school after everything I have done and all the work that I have put in is because I love my teammates,” Martell said. “My whole team knows that. That’s why I am still here at this point because there are probably a ton of other schools I could be staring for right now, just look like what Joe did.” Day understands what Martell has gone through this season, but that he has taken advantage of the opportunities he has been given. “I think he’s been very good. I think he understands the game plan like he always does.” Day said. “It’s hard when you’re not playing to constantly do a good job preparing. Even though you’re not getting on the field. It can be frustrating at times, but he’s done an excellent job this year.” While Day served as the interim head coach and head coach Urban Meyer was suspended for the first three games of the season, Martell said that was when he began to rotate with the first-team offense, getting some time to mold into what he expects to be next season. And through this, a confidence and a relationship between a quarterback and his position coach continued to grow. “I don’t think there is any doubt that coach Day has a pretty good level of confidence in me,” Martell said. “Coach Day knows what I can do and has seen how far I have come. he has a lot of confidence in me and I have obviously a ton of trust in him. He’s a great coach.” Day’s philosophy as an offensive coordinator and as an incoming head coach has been to match the identity of the offense of the offense with the best qualities of the personnel of the players utilized. Expecting to be at the helm of this offense, Martell said he does not expect much to be changed, saying a lot of the aspects of the passing game and the zone read will remain like it was with Haskins. Martell was actually pleased with the run-pass option Ohio State ran with Haskins, something he said he had been able to grow from. “We are reading the linebackers this year which I was actually really happy about because that’s one thing I had to work on which I have gotten really good at now is the R.P.O. blocking up front, throwing off a backer, which I have gotten really good at just through this year because that’s what we have done with Dwayne,” Martell said. “Now I feel comfortable doing pretty much anything in our offense.” The zone-read offense and run-pass option is something Martell said he has been comfortable with, something that comes naturally: To use his athleticism to go and make plays, something he said will return to the Ohio State offense. Martell has shown that in some cases this season, playing in three of the first four games for Ohio State, completing all 10 of his pass attempts against Rutgers on Sept. 8 for 121 yards, adding 95 yards on the ground and scoring two touchdowns. But, even with glimpses of what Martell could do, he thinks opponents have not scratched the surface of what he has the potential to do. “Just going in there, running a couple plays and not really having the ability to show everything that I want, it’s difficult that I had to do that. But I told coach Day and coach Meyer that I would do anything for this team. I told them that in the middle of the year, I said, ‘Whatever this team needs, I’ll go do it,’” Martell said. “But now, at this point, when I go out there, I am going to go out there and put on a show.” Martell has viewed himself as an underdog his entire life, but he has significant goals for himself while at Ohio State. At this point, none of them are for individual stardom: it’s winning games, it’s a national championship. Those are the goals Ohio State has as well. For the team to get to that point, Martell feels like he should be behind center, not Fields. And if Haskins leaves, that’s what he thinks will happen. “I will,” Martell said when asked if he will be the starting quarterback next fall. “I am 100 percent sure on that.” read more