St Joseph’s College – School Team of the Month (January 2012)

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Front row (from left): S Meyers, M Di Ponio, J Tarrant, G Carroll (c), A Beckett, C Lord, C Hayes-Burt. Second row: G Wacokecoke, L Waddleton, C Dobinson, J Richards, E Wright, D Lewis, R Crowley-Power (dark top), A Cooper. Third row: G Hutchings, C Adams, J Willer, M Stanway. Back row: J Palmer, G Murray, L Ludlam, A Broom. St Joseph’s held off King’s Worcester, Lymm HS and OSH to win the Team of the Month award for the first time. The Ipswich school quickly hit form in the spring term with emphatic wins over Campion and Coopers’ Company & Coburn, and memorable cup wins at Skinners’ School and Sir Thomas Rich’s.Wing George Wacokecoke ran in five tries against Coopers and a vital try at Tunbridge Wells against Skinners, but the true character of the side came out in Gloucester, where skipper Gabriel Carroll got the winning try in the final play.A fit, mobile pack that prides itself on doing the simple things well has provided quality ball for an inventive back-line. Lock Jack Palmer has carried ball and got over the gain-line consistently, hooker Chas Hayes-Burt has been a revelation in the loose and No 8 George Murray has been a great organiser, lineout operator and long-range goalkicker.Flanker Carroll has been a non-stop worker in all areas. He, Murray and Shaquille Meyers make an outstanding back row.Fly-half Joe Tarrant has been a great line-breaker, and centres Ethan Wright and Mike Di Ponio have run elusively and created chances for any fielded back three blend of Chris Lord, Austin Beckett, Wacokecoke and Mike Stanway.Check out December’s School team of the MonthThis article appeared in the April 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

Brian O’Driscoll talks technology in rugby

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The Leinster, Ireland and Lions great is keen for the sport to make the most of scientific advancements Brian O’Driscoll talks technology in rugbyThere’s a wry smile on Brian O’Driscoll’s face as he reflects on how much jerseys changed during his playing days, from the huge cotton numbers that looked three sizes too big in 1999 to the skintight versions that were a struggle to get off in 2014.“Those jerseys retired a few front-row forwards before their time was up – there was no hiding any more,” he quips.Brian O’Driscoll in a loose-fitting jersey at RWC 1999 (AFP/Getty Images)While some props may yearn for a return of baggy shirts, technology has helped rugby in other ways, be it analysis, injury prevention, finding new audiences…O’Driscoll believes advances in science could also make a big difference when it comes to brain injuries. World Rugby is trialling eye-tracking technology in this area while a saliva test was 94% accurate in a head injury study.“From a rugby perspective it’s about the tech around detecting concussions, in real time on the pitch, so you’re not having anything slip through the net,” says O’Driscoll. “That’s an area of concern across the amateur and professional game. Rugby wants to limit concussions and safeguard future generations.”Leinster fly-hald Harry Byrne is taken off for an HIA (Sportsfile/Getty Images)Technology has also led to big changes in how sport is shown on television, from player mics to new camera angles. O’Driscoll is part of the BT Sport team so what does he think have been the biggest improvements in rugby broadcasting?“BT likes to be forward-thinking,” says O’Driscoll. “The demo pitch in the BT studio allows you to run through something like the breakdown rather than just talking about it and we’ve got brilliant feedback on that. I know some of the demos have been shown at clubs in the UK and Ireland, to try to explain what the coach is trying to achieve.“Also, at half-time, there may have been five or six tries but if you get the best try, draw it up on an iPad, people can understand why it happened. It’s not just telling people what you see but why you’re seeing it, why it happened. There might have been a held jersey or someone slipping, so it’s highlighting that.”The downside of technology is that our attention spans have got shorter so sport needs new ways to engage audiences. One thing O’Driscoll would like to see is the GPS data players generate during a match reported in real time to provide more of an insight into how much ground players cover, the forces involved in a tackle or the speed people are running at. The dilemma that needs solving is who has the rights to share that data.“Who wants to give up the IP (intellectual property)? Who owns the IP?” asks O’Driscoll. “It would be brilliant if we could share that information. If we want to expand the game, to get to new markets, there are areas you have to be willing to go. Sometimes you give up something to get something in return. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Former Ireland captain Brian O’Driscoll in now a TV pundit (NurPhoto/Getty Images) “That could almost drive competition too. People want to be part of leaderboards over the course of a season – who covered the most distance? Who got the highest speed? All of that is exciting and it’s how you can captivate people on a week-to-week basis rather than dipping in and out.” O’Driscoll is one of the judges in BT Sport’s Innovate 21 competition, which is looking for new ideas in sports broadcasting – perhaps that will lead to other ways to draw in viewers.BT have already introduced innovations this past year. Take Watch Together: with the pandemic preventing fans from being in stadia or pubs to watch matches, BT developed a way for friends to watch a match via the app while being able to see each other and chat.The winner of the Innovate 21 competition, which closes on 31 July, will have the opportunity to develop their idea with BT. O’Driscoll says: “I’m looking forward to seeing something new coming in. You never know where the next brilliant innovation will come from.“Who would have thought you could watch a game with some of your pals on a phone? It’s brilliant tech. The ingenuity and innovation of people can flabbergast you.”last_img read more

Dawani reflects on the situation for refugees in the Middle…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (5) Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Rev’d Canon Samir J. Habiby says: Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY The Rev’d Canon Samir J. Habiby says: November 2, 2015 at 11:07 pm The Diocese of Jeusalem in its Refugee work in Jordan, and indeed the entire Province of The Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East with its Four constituent dioceses are heavily impacted with Refugees. Archbishop Suheil presents the larger Church with both a challenge and an with that an opportunity expressive of our Lord’d Dominical impertaive in St. Matthew’s Gospel …. “In as much as you have done this to the least of my brothers and sisters you have done ths to Me. …”. This was the guiding light that caused the Church during and in the aftermath of WWII to establish its arm of caingcompassion, in effect the human face of the Community of Faith, the Presiding Bishops Fund for World Relief, and since the year 2,000 separated into two agencies, one directly a part of the national staff known as Episcopal Migration Ministries, and the other with its own Board known as Episcopal Relief and Development. Both in celebrating their 75th Anniversaries have stood fast in reaching out to those in need. However when both were part of the PBFWR with the Presiding Bishop as the Chair, and four members of the Fund’s Board as members of the Executive Council, in major domestic and global emergencies, the Presiding Bishop with the Executive Council would immediately issue a Special Appeal, as in the East Africa Famine as well as in the Lebanon Civil War, to which the Church responded generously to in concert with its Ecumenical and Interfaith Partners as CWS, LWR, and in consortias with global Agencies that had similar charters as Save the Children, endeavoring to meet the many urgent relief as well as longer communal devlopment needs of those facing loss of home and livlihood, especially of women and children due to civil war and natural disasters. The response of the Emergency appeal by the Presiding Bishop for the Fund in the Lebanon Appeal brought in over a period of a few months some three million “extra mile” Dollars (in the 1980’s worth of the Dollar) ~ and the same for the East Africa Famine, among such other lextra milel generous contributions throughout the Church. All this in addition to the resettlement of thousands of refugees adopted by local congregations from among the Refugees admitted into the United States.In the years since then much has been accomplished in serving human need by EMM and ERD and continues today. However with the continuing civil wars in Syria, Iraq, Libya, the Yemen and Somalia, the global family, as Archbishop Suheil has indicated, especially the Congregations in his diocese and elsewhere, while overwhelemd with numbers of refugees in their mmidst are nevertheless reaching to assuage the suffering and deprivation of the many tens of thousands of refugees, and ard facing an all consuming challenege not experienced by the global family since the displacements in WWII, These many millions of Refugees and Asylum Seekers fleeing their homelands daily are seeking refuge and safety in neighboring countries as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, and many families in their despair of overcrowded camps with minimal services are perishing at Sea in unworthy crafts seeking to reach the safety of Europe. The.Challenge is clearly before us as a Church in the promise made by our Blessed Lord in St. John’s Gospel …. “I have come that you have life and have it abundantly”.The question before us is how to face the complex realities of the Millions of Refugees that urgently need the assistance of all our Faith Communities. Both EMM, ERD, as well UTO and Church related private caring agencies as the American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem (AFEDJ surely welcome the generous Offerings of each of us today in our time, talent as well as treasurein seeking to alleviate such massive human suffering and displacement. Thank you Archbishop Suheil for your challenge and exemplry refugee related ministies in hospitality, social services, health care and education in the Diocese of Jerusalem with that of the three other dioceses in the Province in the Call to Serve the Refugees made by Archbishop Anis.Respectfully,The.Rev’d Canon Samir J. HabibyA Past Executive Director of the Presiding Bishopks Fund for World Relief Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Alison de Lavis says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Rev’d Canon Samir J. Habiby says: Israel-Palestine, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL By Archbishop Suheil DawaniPosted Nov 2, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: November 2, 2015 at 10:13 pm Very moving. I am sorry he doesn’t include how we can send donations to help the Network. Photo: Matthew Davies/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem] Reflection by the Archbishop in Jerusalem, the Most Rev. Suheil Dawani, on the situation for refugees in the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem and the Middle East.The Samaritan “bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine; and he set him on his animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day, when he departed, he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper and said to him, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, when I come again, I will repay you.’” (Luke 10:34-35The story of the good Samaritan is one that is a guide to Christians across the globe as to how we can be neighbours for those who need us, whoever she or he may be; and it is, I believe, relevant all the more so in our approach to how we as individuals and communities welcome and care for refugees. It is with this in mind that I write, aware of the extraordinary work that ordinary men and women in our Diocese are doing in caring for refugees from Syria and Iraq. The refugee crisis is serious – very serious – and demands that we respond with compassion and care to people who have faced untold horrors, and who have had to leave their martyrs behind.As refugees seek sanctuary, we as Christians are challenged to open our doors and share what we have with strangers. Archbishop Mouneer in his article Our calling: Welcome refugees, support development, make peace, (posted on the ACNS, Anglican Communion News Service, 28th September 2015) cites Jesus commandment that we must share what we have. If we cannot for whatever reason share our house, then we must share our gifts and our resources.Hospitality is one of the hallmarks of this diocese: for centuries we have shown hospitality to pilgrims, to people who went on their way “sometimes not knowing whither they would come”, but seeking an expression of the Kingdom of God, as Abraham did. On other occasions and throughout history the Churches of the region extended hospitality to the thousands of people forced to leave their homes for an unknown destination. During the past one hundred years there were Circassian refugees from Russia, Armenians from Turkey, Jews from Europe, refugees from Palestine, Iraq, Soudan, and many other places. Now our challenge is to show hospitality to yet another traveler, refugees and migrants from Syria.At the moment Jordan welcomes some 1.25 million Syrians, 300,000 Iraqis, 400,000 Egyptians, 100,000 Libyans and 50,000 Yemenis. In Irbid (Northern Jordan) there are 250,000 refugees; and in the refugee camp of Zaatari’s on the Syrian border there are some 120,000 people who live in tents and caravans. Places that were once desert are now large towns, which require infrastructure, including schools and hospitals, electricity and water, shops and roads, and much more.One way the Church has managed to respond is through “The Network”, which, under the supervision of The Rev’d Canon ‘Brother Andrew’ De Carpentier of the Anglican “Holy Land Institute for Deaf and Deafblind Children” in Salt, has brought together different local organizations providing essential medical and paramedical care to thousands of refugees with disabilities in need. The “Network” is a partnership between: The Dhia Society (a Jordanian charity for visually impaired children), The Raja society (a school for the education and training of those with cognitive issues), The Avicenna (Ibn Sina) society (a Jordanian organization for helping those with mobility issues); and the Palestine Hospital (A Church-affiliated specialist hospital for Trauma and Neurology).Another way the Church responded is through the work of St Paul’s church in Ashrafiyeh – Amman. The Reverend George Kopti describes how refugees have become part of the church family, with activities provided for the children and for women, as well as a new mid-week Bible study for the Christians who have fled. As winter approaches, the congregation are gathering gas stoves to hand, and distributing food coupons.The Rev’d Canon Samir Esaid, vicar of The Virgin Mary Episcopal Church in Irbid explained how his church is reaching out to refugees in the community with a special focus on providing education and support to parents of children who are blind or visually impaired. It helps parents cope with their children who attend the Arab Episcopal School for visually impaired and sighted children. Not only did they take in refugees as students, but in one instant also had a refugee working as a volunteer teacher in the school. He explained that for many the border between Syria and Jordan was quite arbitrary as related families were living on both sides, with many Jordanians now looking after their Syrian relatives.It is hard for those who have not experienced the need to flee their homeland to envisage what life is like. Where is the next meal? Where will I sleep tonight? What about my children’s education? What shall I do for my child who is ill? Where shall I go with my child who is blind or deaf, who is traumatized and disturbed? Who can help me with a child that has mobility problems, suffers of epilepsy or cerebral palsy? These are real questions for real people looking for sanctuary, safety and friendship.What is heartening is that these experiences give us all faith in humanity and encourage us to go the extra mile and help those in need as Christ asks us to. If all of us, whoever and wherever we are, can reach out to those who are suffering, whether they are strangers seeking sanctuary or are well known to us, I believe our lives will be transformed and become more like the person Christ calls us to be: Good Samaritans, brothers to all whom we encounter, sharing our gifts, and ultimately grafting our lives more into Jesus when his love, compassion and generosity work in and through us.AMEN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing November 2, 2015 at 10:26 pm The Diocese of Jeusalem in its Refugee work in Jordan, and indeed the entire Province of The Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East with its Four constituent dioceses are heavily impacted with Refugees. Archbishop Suheil presents the larger Church with both a challenge and an with that an opportunity expressive of our Lord’d Dominical impertaive in St. Matthew’s Gospel …. “In as much as you have done this to the least of my brothers and sisters you have done ths to m. …”. This was the guiding light that caused the Church during and in the aftermath of WWII to establish its arm of caingcompassion, in effect the human face of the Community of Faith, the Presiding Bishops Fund for World Relief, and since the year 2,000 separated into two agencies, one directly a part of the national staff known as Episcopal Migration Ministries, and the other with its own Board known as Episcopal Relief and Development. Both in celebrating their 75th Anniversaries have stod fast in reaching out to thos in need. However when both were part of the PBFWR with the Presiding Bishop as the Chair, and four members of the 12 member Board as members of the Executive Council, in major domestic and global emergencies, the Presiding Bishop with the Executive Council would immediately issue a Special Appeal, as in the East Africa Famin as well as in the Lebanon Civil Warto wich the Church responded generously in concert with its Ecumenical and Interfaith Partners as well as Agencies that had similar charters as Save the Children in endeavoring to meet the many relief as well as devlopment needs of those facing loss of home and livlihood, especially of women and children due to civil war and natural disasters. The response of the Emergency appeal by the Presiding Bishop to the Lebanon Appeal brought in some three million “extra mile” Dollars in the 1980’s worth of the Dollar and the same for the East Africa Famine among such other contributions throughout the Church. All this in addition to the resettlement of thousands of refugees adopted by local congregations from among Refugees admitted into the United States.In the years since then much has been accomplished in serving human need by EMM and ERD and continues today. However with the continuing civil wars in Syria, Iraq, Libya, the Yemen and Somalia, the global family as Archbishop Suheil has indicated that, the Congregations in his diocese and elsewhere are facing an all conxuming challenege not experienced since WWII with so many millions of Refugees and Asylum Seekers fleeing their homelands daily In the many thousands seeking refuge and safety in neighboring countries as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey,, and many perising at Sea in unworthy crafts seeking to reach the safety of Europe. The.Challenege is clearly before us as Church, and in the promis of our Blessed Lord in St. John’s Gospel …. “I have come that you have life and have it abundantly”. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS November 2, 2015 at 11:10 pm The Diocese of Jeusalem in its Refugee work in Jordan, and indeed the entire Province of The Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East with its Four constituent dioceses are heavily impacted with Refugees. Archbishop Suheil presents the larger Church with both a challenge and an with that an opportunity expressive of our Lord’d Dominical impertaive in St. Matthew’s Gospel …. “In as much as you have done this to the least of my brothers and sisters you have done ths to Me. …”. This was the guiding light that caused the Church during and in the aftermath of WWII to establish its arm of caingcompassion, in effect the human face of the Community of Faith, the Presiding Bishops Fund for World Relief, and since the year 2,000 separated into two agencies, one directly a part of the national staff known as Episcopal Migration Ministries, and the other with its own Board known as Episcopal Relief and Development. Both in celebrating their 75th Anniversaries have stood fast in reaching out to those in need. However when both were part of the PBFWR with the Presiding Bishop as the Chair, and four members of the Fund’s Board as members of the Executive Council, in major domestic and global emergencies, the Presiding Bishop with the Executive Council would immediately issue a Special Appeal, as in the East Africa Famine as well as in the Lebanon Civil War, to which the Church responded generously to in concert with its Ecumenical and Interfaith Partners as CWS, LWR, and in consortias with global Agencies that had similar charters as Save the Children, endeavoring to meet the many urgent relief as well as longer communal devlopment needs of those facing loss of home and livlihood, especially of women and children due to civil war and natural disasters. The response of the Emergency appeal by the Presiding Bishop for the Fund in the Lebanon Appeal brought in over a period of a few months some three million “extra mile” Dollars (in the 1980’s worth of the Dollar) ~ and the same for the East Africa Famine, among such other lextra milel generous contributions throughout the Church. All this in addition to the resettlement of thousands of refugees adopted by local congregations from among the Refugees admitted into the United States.In the years since then much has been accomplished in serving human need by EMM and ERD and continues today. However with the continuing civil wars in Syria, Iraq, Libya, the Yemen and Somalia, the global family, as Archbishop Suheil has indicated, especially the Congregations in his diocese and elsewhere, while overwhelemd with numbers of refugees in their mmidst are nevertheless reaching to assuage the suffering and deprivation of the many tens of thousands of refugees, and ard facing an all consuming challenege not experienced by the global family since the displacements in WWII, These many millions of Refugees and Asylum Seekers fleeing their homelands daily are seeking refuge and safety in neighboring countries as Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, and many families in their despair of overcrowded camps with minimal services are perishing at Sea in unworthy crafts seeking to reach the safety of Europe. The.Challenge is clearly before us as a Church in the promise made by our Blessed Lord in St. John’s Gospel …. “I have come that you have life and have it abundantly”.The question before us is how to face the complex realities of the Millions of Refugees that urgently need the assistance of all our Faith Communities. Both EMM, ERD, as well UTO and Church related private caring agencies as the American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem (AFEDJ surely welcome the generous Offerings of each of us today in our time, talent as well as treasurein seeking to alleviate such massive human suffering and displacement. Thank you Archbishop Suheil for your challenge and exemplry refugee related ministies in hospitality, social services, health care and education in the Diocese of Jerusalem with that of the three other dioceses in the Province in the Call to Serve the Refugees made by Archbishop Anis.Respectfully,The.Rev’d Canon Samir J. HabibyA Past Executive Director of the Presiding Bishopks Fund for World Relief Middle East, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ November 7, 2015 at 5:14 pm The American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem helps fund the humanitarian work of Archbishop Dawani and the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. Donations can be made online at http://www.afedj.org. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Dawani reflects on the situation for refugees in the Middle East Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Vigils held for Burundi as African Union warns of genocide

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Vigils held for Burundi as African Union warns of genocide Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release [Anglican Communion News Service] Coventry Cathedral was set to take part in a vigil for Burundi Dec. 18 as the African Union warned of an impending genocide in the east African country. And staff at the Anglican Communion Office in London also paused to pray for peace for the troubled country.There has been increasing violence over the past few months and an attempted coup following the decision by President Pierre Nkurunziza to seek re-election for an unprecedented third term – an election that he won.Earlier this month a boy was killed and two people injured during an attack on St. Mark’s Church in the Ngagara district of the capital Bujumbura. He was one of several hundred to have been killed since the violence began. Friday of last week saw the deadliest day of the violence with about 100 killed in clashes.Responding to the recent upturn in violence, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, urged “all actors in the current crisis, including political leaders and state authorities at the highest level, to take every step possible to stop this deadly escalation and engage in a meaningful and inclusive dialogue.” He warned: “With this latest series of bloody events, the country seems to have taken a new step towards outright civil war and tensions are now at bursting point in Bujumbura.”The African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council has been discussing the situation in Burundi and agreed on the text of a communique. The text will be released later, but in a series of tweets from the meeting, the AU said that “Africa will NOT allow another Genocide to take place on its soil.”The tweets said that the AU Peace and Security Council members were “exchanging views on the situation in Burundi” and discussing “the urgent need for action to stop the killings.” They were also discussing contingency plans for the possible deployment of African Union peacekeeping troops to the country.Coventry is home to the largest community of Burundian people in the U.K. They were set to join with the city’s faith and community leaders for a peace vigil on Dec. 18 to raise awareness of the recent struggles in the country.“In the last two weeks, political unrest has resulted in the death of over 100 Burundians as Politicians struggle to find a way to stop the country sliding in to civil war,” the Coventry Burundian Community’s vice-chair, Lise Ndiyo, said. “Coventry welcomes refugees and stands for peace and reconciliation, and we’re hoping this peace vigil will raise the profile of what is happening there as we all come together as a multi-cultural community.The canon for reconciliation at Coventry Cathedral, the Rev. Canon Sarah Hills, said, “The struggles of the people in Burundi have been in our thoughts and prayers for a number of years. We, at the cathedral, will be standing side-by-side with the Burundian Community showing our support and praying for peace.”In September, the Standing Committee of the Anglican Communion called on “Christians of all denominations to pray fervently for Burundi.”In a statement issued after receiving reports from the situation in Burundi at that time, the Standing Committee members called on “those in leadership to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable ahead of their own interests.”They added: “We call on the UN, the African Union and the East African Community to renew all possible efforts to support peace . . . and we call on the leaders in Burundi earnestly to seek peace and pursue it and especially to call the various political leaders to resume immediately serious and inclusive dialogue.“Reconciliation is always a demanding process, but bears fruit in saved lives and stable communities. May Burundi be blessed with leadership that brings true and generous reconciliation!”The vigil begins with a march from the city’s council offices to University Square, outside the cathedral from 4 p.m., and a vigil from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.The Rev. Canon Phil Groves, director of the Continuing Indaba program for the Anglican Communion, has invited staff at the ACO to gather for prayer in the chapel of St. Andrew’s House. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Africa, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By ACNS staffPosted Dec 18, 2015 last_img read more

In Profile: Jerusalem St. George’s Cathedral Dean Hosam Naoum

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Anglican Communion News Service] The dean of St. George’s Cathedral in Jerusalem, the Very Revd Hosam Naoum, discusses life and ministry in the Holy Land in this interview, which first appeared in the newsletter of the Diocese of Jerusalem.Full article. Middle East, Rector Bath, NC Tags Posted Dec 12, 2016 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion, Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In Profile: Jerusalem St. George’s Cathedral Dean Hosam Naoum Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

El respaldo a Roca Enhiesta le enseñó solidaridad a los…

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Indigenous Ministries, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 22, 2017 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Parte de las más de 3.000 libras de harina recuperadas del campamento de Oceti Sakowin, que tenían los protectores del agua cerca de Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte, esperan por un nuevo hogar en el garaje del Rdo. John Floberg en Bismark. Foto de John Floberg[Episcopal News Service] El Rdo. John Floberg tiene más de 3.000 libras de harina en su garaje. Dependiendo del punto de vista, las bolsas simbolizan o bien la misión y el ministerio de la Iglesia Episcopal o la ley de consecuencias imprevistas, o ambas cosas.Floberg, sacerdote encargado de las congregaciones episcopales del lado de Dakota del Norte de la reserva india de Roca Enhiesta (Standing Rock) rescató la harina cuando se desmontó el campamento de los protectores del agua en Oceti Sakowin cerca de Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte. Es lo que quedó después de que él y otras personas distribuyeran centenares de bolsas a los bancos de alimentos de la zona.La Iglesia Episcopal comenzó a solidarizarse con la Nación Sioux de Roca Enhiesta a mediados de 2016 para apoyar su lucha contra el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas. La Iglesia respaldó el reclamo de la soberanía tribal y el deseo de la tribu de proteger su agua potable y sus tierras que tenían una importancia cultural.Incluso para una Iglesia que se ha destacado por su labor en pro de la justicia y de la reconciliación, los episcopales aprendieron algunas lecciones que les recordaron su llamado a una obra de justicia social que es amplia, profunda y coordinada. Las lecciones pueden resultar muy útiles a la Iglesia la próxima vez que incurra en una campaña de defensa social en cualquier escala.Algunas lecciones fueron teológicas; otras fueron logísticas. Algunas abarcaron ambos aspectos.Los episcopales aprendieron acerca de la extensión a la que son llamados a reconciliarse con todos los pueblos. Aprendieron a escuchar y a discernir antes de actuar. La Iglesia aprendió que mostrarse solidaria puede acarrear costos inesperados.“Para nosotros como Iglesia, lo que estamos aprendiendo es lo que ya sabemos; sencillamente se nos confirma, que cuando queremos asociarnos con comunidades cuya salud y subsistencia están amenazados, en verdad necesitamos escuchar lo que ellos quieren y no presumir de que sabemos más”, dijo Heidi Kim, funcionaria encargada del personal denominacional para la reconciliación racial en la Iglesia Episcopal.El Rdo. Bradley S. Hauff, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para el ministerio indígena, sugiere que Roca Enhiesta sirvió para recordarles a los episcopales que “los problemas de justicia, ya sean políticos, económicos, ambientales o raciales, deben ser prioridades para nuestra Iglesia porque eso es lo que hacemos como seguidores de Cristo”.Los episcopales de la localidad, y, en ocasiones, los episcopales de otros lugares, ministraron a los vecinos del lugar y a los recién llegados que se incorporaban a la protesta. La reunión atrajo a miembros de casi 300 tribus en una muestra de unidad sin precedentes que resucitó el movimiento de los derechos indígenas en Estados Unidos. Entre 6.000 y 10.000 personas, indígenas y no indígenas, se congregaron a lo largo del río.La Rda. Lauren R. Stanley, a la izquierda, presbítera superintendente de la misión episcopal de Rosebud (Oeste), y el Rdo. John Floberg, sacerdote a cargo de la misión episcopal de Roca Enhiesta en el lado de Dakota del Norte, poco después del anuncio del Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU. Foto de Paul Lebens-Englund.El oleoducto pasa por debajo del lago Oahe, parte del río Misurí, que fluye a lo largo del linde oriental de Roca Enhiesta. La tribu tiene agua, así como derechos de caza y pesca en el lago. Los líderes sioux han advertido en repetidas ocasiones de que un derrame de petróleo afectaría el suministro de agua de la reserva y dijeron que el oleoducto constituía una amenaza a sus lugares sagrados y a sus derechos pactados [con el gobierno federal].La compañía que construye el oleoducto, Energy Transfer Partners, dice que será seguro y mejor que transportar el petróleo por carretera o por ferrocarril. El 1 de junio comenzó a fluir el petróleo a través del oleoducto de 1886 kilómetros de largo y 76 centímetros de diámetro. La vía transportará hasta 470.000 barriles de petróleo al día desde los terrenos petrolíferos de Bakken en el noroeste de Dakota del Norte —pasando por Dakota del Sur y Iowa— hasta Illinois, desde donde lo embarcarán a las refinerías.Hauff dijo que los episcopales han aprendido que son llamados a esas tareas de defensa social “independientemente del resultado, independientemente de si resultan exitosas”. La tribu no ha logrado todavía su objetivo de que las autoridades que otorgan los permisos respeten sus derechos pactados y renegocien una ruta que aleje el oleoducto de sus fuentes de agua potable.“Pero eso no importa. Lo hacemos porque es lo que debe hacerse”, dijo Hauff. “Somos llamados a intentarlo. El tener o no tener éxito no está en nuestras manos. Pero tenemos que tratar y seguir tratando de enmendar los errores del mundo, o al menos señalarlos”.La historia de Roca Enhiesta sigue desenvolviéndose. El 14 de junio, un juez federal dictaminó que el Cuerpo [de Ingenieros] del Ejército de EE.UU. “no consideró adecuadamente los impactos de un derrame de petróleo en los derechos de pesca, los derechos de caza o la justicia medioambiental”. El juez James Boasberg, del tribunal federal de distrito, dijo que el Cuerpo [de Ingenieros del Ejército] debe reconsiderar esos problemas. Si el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas debe interrumpir las operaciones en el ínterin, se trata de otro asunto que no se ha abordado todavía.‘Reputación’ y racismoCuando la resistencia local a la ruta del oleoducto se inició en abril de 2016, Floberg y otros episcopales comenzaron a discernir el lugar de la Iglesia en el incipiente movimiento de protección del agua. Se organizaron para ayudar a la tribu a proteger sus derechos soberanos y su agua potable.Floberg, que ha ministrado a los residentes de la reserva (y junto con ellos) durante más de 20 años, pidió en repetidas ocasiones a los episcopales que se solidarizaran con la tribu. Les instó a evitar las otras agendas que giraban en torno al río Misurí.Su labor detrás de bambalinas, junto con una visita en septiembre del obispo primado Michael Curry y el apoyo del Consejo Ejecutivo, cambió la reputación de la Iglesia sobre Roca Enhiesta.El obispo primado Michael Curry habla el 24 de septiembre en el campamento de Oceti Sakowin. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.“Es ampliamente conocido que la Iglesia Episcopal intervino. Es ampliamente conocido que la Iglesia Episcopal participó allí activamente y puso su propia vida, su propia reputación al lado de la tribu y de todos sus miembros”, dijo Floberg.En los primeros tiempos del oleoducto, los agentes de las fuerzas de orden público elaboraron una campaña de desinformación para desacreditar a los que protestaban. Apelaron “muchísimo a un lenguaje muy provocativo”, dijo Floberg, refiriéndose a “una insurgencia ideológicamente motivada con un notable componente religioso”. La página web Intercept informaba recientemente que la compañía del oleoducto contrató a TigerSwan, una firma de seguridad fundada por miembros jubilados de fuerzas especiales del Ejército, para dirigir esa campaña.“Aunque nos desacreditaban, aunque los arrestos ascendieron a centenares, hasta 700, la Iglesia Episcopal no abandonó su compromiso y sus declaraciones públicas”, dijo Floberg. “Eso fue decisivo”.Algunos de los objetivos y tácticas de los protectores del agua no coincidían con los de los sioux de Roca Enhiesta, pero, dijo Floberg, él sabía que el núcleo era un movimiento pacífico. “También supe que el estado de Dakota del Norte estaba usando tácticas que acrecentaban todo el asunto, y ahora hay evidencia de ello en público”, afirmó refiriéndose a la participación de TigerSwan.La Rda. Lauren Stanley, presbítera supervisora de la reserva Botón de Rosa [Rosebud] en el noroeste de Dakota del Sur, dijo que la Iglesia había estado marcando “una enorme diferencia respecto a las relaciones de los blancos con los nativos”. Pero, añadió, “Roca Enhiesta hizo brotar lo peor del racismo”. Fue difícil encontrar aliados entre la población no nativa de las dakotas.Floberg pertenece a un grupo bisoño de clérigos ecuménicos que procuran salirle al paso al racismo persistente.Más de 500 testigos interreligiosos marchan rumbo norte por la Autopista 1806 el 3 de noviembre hacia el puente Backwter donde formaron el Círculo de la Vida Niobrara. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.“Para poder defender los derechos de los nativos, a los que nadie presta atención en este país en absoluto, se galvanizó esta Iglesia para decir: ‘sí, este es un momento del pacto bautismal’”, dijo Stanley. “¿Vamos a respetar la dignidad de todo ser humano, vamos a trabajar a favor de la justicia y de la paz, o no vamos a hacerlo?”Solidarizarse con Roca Enhiesta resultó arriesgado para la reputación de la Iglesia Episcopal, incluso entre sus propios miembros. “Supimos que algunas personas de la iglesia —y esto probablemente no es un conocimiento nuevo para la Iglesia Episcopal en absoluto— no pueden tolerar que la Iglesia asuma una postura que es contraria a la suya personal”, dijo Floberg. “De manera que debido a esto perdimos a algunas personas en la Iglesia Episcopal de Dakota del Norte. Sé que perdimos algunos en Minot y perdimos algunos en Bismarck.Defensa social mediante la acción, no sólo de palabraSin embargo, esa participación impresionó a otros. Personas que no iban a la iglesia, especialmente indígenas, que no estaban habituados a ver a cristianos en solidaridad con los nativos. Para los episcopales solidarizarse con los activistas de Roca Enhiesta que no sólo no eran episcopales, que ni siquiera eran cristianos, “significó muchísimo para personas que estaban involucradas en estas batallas”, dijo Hauff.Para el Rdo. Brandon Mauai, diácono de la reserva sioux de Roca Enhiesta y uno de los organizadores de la respuesta de la Iglesia Episcopal, la emergente solidaridad entre la Iglesia y el pueblo indígena impartió una impactante lección.“No sólo estamos con la gente de Roca Enhiesta y todas las naciones nativas, sino también, somos capaces de estar entre ellas como Iglesia y decirles que nosotros, la Iglesia Episcopal, y muchas otras denominaciones, hemos repudiado la Doctrina del Descubrimiento”, dijo Mauai.En 2009, la Iglesia Episcopal denunció el documento emitido en 1493 que pretendía otorgarles a los exploradores cristianos el derecho a reclamar las tierras que habían “descubierto” y a convertir a las personas que habían encontrado. Durante una reunión interreligiosa de más de 500 clérigos en Roca Enhiesta el 3 de noviembre, los ministros quemaron una copia del documento cerca del fuego sagrado del campamento Oceti Sakowin.Líderes religiosos en representación de episcopales, luteranos, presbiterianos, bautistas y otros leyeron el repudio de sus denominaciones a la Doctrina del Descubrimiento. Luego les dieron una copia del documento del siglo XV —que le otorga el derecho a los exploradores cristianos de reclamar las tierras que habían descubierto— a ancianos del campamento de Oceti Sakowin y les pidieron que la quemaran. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.“La Convención General puede aprobar una resolución tras otra repudiando la Doctrina del Descubrimiento y todo eso está muy bien, pero no todos los nativos son episcopales”, dijo Mauai. “Estar en presencia de ellos y simbólicamente quemar este pedazo de papel y decirles que no creemos en este documento y que estamos aquí a favor de ellos, significó muchísimo”.Como nativo y como diácono episcopal, dijo Mauai, las cenizas de ese documento simbolizaron el comienzo de algo que era necesario que ocurriera.“Es nuestro deber personarse allí y hacerlo saber, y actuar de tal manera que seamos compasivos y estemos dispuestos a reconciliarnos por todo lo que nuestros antepasados de las antiguas iglesias pudieron haber hecho”, apuntó.Escuchar antes de actuarLa postura de la Iglesia con Roca Enhiesta les dio a los episcopales un modo de “poner en práctica sus votos del Pacto Bautismal de una manera que se necesita desesperadamente en este país”, arguyó Stanley.Sin embargo, es importante para los episcopales no asumir que saben exactamente cómo actuar respecto a esos votos en [lo tocante a] Roca Enhiesta. Deben escuchar lo que las personas necesitan de la Iglesia y, dijo Hauff, lo que no necesitan.Deben aprender que “no todos los indígenas piensan lo mismo respecto a todos los asuntos” y muchos son política y teológicamente conservadores, afirmó.Carmen Goodhouse, una humkpapa lakota de pura cepa, habla con el obispo primado Michael Curry durante un momento para escuchar el 24 de septiembre en el campamento de Oceti Sakowin. El obispo de Dakota del Norte, John Tarrant, está sentado al lado de Curry. El Rdo. John Floberg, que aparece detrás de Curry, preparó esta sesión. Floberg es un sacerdote supervisor de las iglesias episcopales de la parte de Dakota del Norte en la reserva de Roca Enhiesta. El Rdo. Brandon Mauai, ex miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo, que aparece a la izquierda de Floberg, también participó en la bienvenida de Curry al campamento. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Muchos miembros tribales reconocieron el beneficio económico que traería consigo la construcción del oleoducto y su gestión, dijeron él y Kim. Ellos no estaban completamente opuestos a los combustibles fósiles ni a los oleoductos.Todo lo que la nación sioux quería, dijo Kim, era proteger su agua potable de la misma manera que lo hicieron los vecinos de Bismarck, que objetaron que el oleoducto se acercara demasiado al suministro de agua de la ciudad capital y el Cuerpo de Ingenieros cambió la ruta.Algunos activistas medioambientales aprovecharon el oleoducto para protestar de cualquier uso de combustibles fósiles, dijo Hauff. Eso dio lugar a agendas y tácticas contradictorias, algunas puestas en práctica por personas que incurrieron en lo que Kim llamó una actitud autocomplaciente respecto a ser activistas “en la reserva”.La Iglesia Episcopal fue sólo uno de los muchos grupos que participaron [en la protesta de] Roca Enhiesta. “No teníamos ningún control sobre lo que hicieron todos los otros grupos, pero tuvimos control sobre nosotros mismos y creo que lo hicimos bien”, afirmó Hauff.Kim dijo que el liderazgo de Floberg en Roca Enhiesta epitomizaba el papel de la Iglesia y puede ser una guía para la defensa social del futuro.“Una de las cosas que me gustan respecto a la manera en que John [Floberg] organizó al clero y a los laicos que vinieron a Roca Enhiesta era que se trataba solamente de oración —oración y manifestación pacífica”, dijo Kim de la reunión del 3 de noviembre. Algunos clérigos de otras denominaciones viajaron al norte a Bismarck más tarde ese día, decididos a que los arrestaran para mostrar su compromiso. Floberg siempre se pronunció en contra de tales manifestaciones.El campamento de Oceti Sakowin se extendía a fines de enero a lo largo del terreno donde el río Misurí se encuentra con el río Cannonball. La Autopista 1806 de Dakota del Norte puede verse que se extiende de un extremo a otro en la parte superior de la foto. Foto de Oceti Sakowin vía FacebookMinisterio de presencia en forma prácticaJunto con la defensa social y la solidaridad, la Iglesia tuvo un ministerio de presencia esencial y práctico.La iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James Episcopal Church] en Cannon Ball, una de las iglesias que atiende Floberg, ofreció un lugar donde reunirse. Su cocina y un Wi-Fi que funcionaba fueron extras. La bandera de la Iglesia Episcopal ondeaba en el campamento de Oceti Sakowin. El área que marcaba se conocía como un sitio de acogida.Para anticipar donde habrían de necesitarlos, Floberg y otros observaban lo que estaba sucediendo y escuchaban lo que se decía, incluidas las redes sociales. Pronto se dieron cuenta de que el campamento necesitaba inodoros portátiles y contenedores de basura. Los episcopales le dijeron al resto de la Iglesia que querían ayudar a la tribu a costearlos y la gente donó dinero.Los episcopales no pudieron prever con tanta claridad otras necesidades. Floberg dijo que el ministerio en Roca Enhiesta “siempre se habría quedado a la zaga” de no haber sido por personas que contribuyeron con dinero y confiaron en que se usaría con prudencia.Los episcopales donaron $116.369,29 para el esfuerzo solidario con Roca Enhiesta, según dijo Floberg. El dinero cubrió cosas tales como la cena de Navidad en Santiago Apóstol, varios tipos de apoyo en los campamentos y gastos de alojamiento. Adelantándose a las necesidades futuras, los episcopales compraron un remolque de carga, un remolque de volcado y un montacargas.Cuando las autoridades decidieron cerrar los campamentos, les pidieron ayuda a los episcopales. Floberg vio [cual era] la primera tarea de la Iglesia: “logramos que la gente saliera de esto sin perjuicio”. Él reclutó a personas con camionetas y furgonetas.Luego, estaban todos los materiales que se quedaron por detrás. En diciembre, una tormenta derribó y sepultó las tiendas de campaña y otras estructuras endebles —escombros que la tribu no quería que las inundaciones de primavera arrastran al río.Además, dijo Floberg, “todo el mundo que vino al campamento parecía necesitado de traer una bolsa de macarrones o una bolsa de harina”. Más aún, la gente envío bienes materiales que no eran necesarios. Las donaciones fueron una involuntaria consecuencia de la constante cobertura de la prensa. Algunos, dijo Kim, vinieron con lo que ella llamó un “modelo colonial”, el supuesto de que la reserva era tan pobre que los residentes apreciarían las donaciones.Antes y después del cierre, Floberg ayudó a rescatar y distribuir más de 7.000 libras de arroz, frijoles y macarrones, así como gran parte de la harina, para los bancos de alimentos de la zona. El resto de la harina está ahora en su garaje, a la espera de encontrar un hogar.Gilbert Summers, a la izquierda, y Isaiah Floberg recogen alimentos aprovechables en el campamento de Oceti Sakowin, en febrero, para evitar que las inundaciones de primavera los arrastren al río. Foto de John Floberg¿Ahora qué?“Lo que sabemos en la Iglesia es que ahora cuando los campamentos están vacíos y el oleoducto está pasando, ahora es cuando somos verdaderamente llamados a caminar en solidaridad con la comunidad cuyas [reservas de] agua se ven amenazadas”, dijo Kim, “Sólo porque las cámaras se han ido, no significa que el ministerio se haya terminado. Ahora que las cámaras se han ido el ministerio puede comenzar en serio”.Esa fue una lección que la Iglesia empezó a aprender mientras los episcopales respondían a la muerte de Michael Brown en 2014 en Ferguson, Misurí, dijo Kim.Mni Wiconi, el Agua es la Vida, ha sido el lema de la resistencia al Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas cuya ruta ahora pasa cerca de un kilómetro al norte de la reserva sioux de Roca Enhiesta en Dakota del Norte. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.“Lo que reconocemos es que necesitamos distanciarnos de toda la hipérbole”, dijo ella. “uno no puede participar realmente en una conversación en torno al discernimiento, la colaboración y la verdadera asociación cuando todo eso está sucediendo”.En tanto la Iglesia Episcopal continúa ministrando a la Nación Sioux de Roca Enhiesta, y junto a ella, los episcopales de todas partes pueden usar el ejemplo para sus propias comunidades.“Descubra en el territorio de quién vive. No haga el gran reclamo acerca de Roca Enhiesta a menos que esté en disposición de presentar la iniciativa en su localidad”, dijo Floberg. “Lo que hay de cierto respecto a la relación de Roca Enhiesta con el gobierno federal, lo que hay de cierto respecto a los asuntos y problemas de Roca Enhiesta, es válido para todo el país indio. No es que el gobierno federal esté tratando de manera diferente con Roca Enhiesta de lo hace de las otras entidades tribales en cualquier otra parte”.Hauff dijo que había incluso una lección mayor para la Iglesia. Su poder de permanencia —y su ministerio más efectivo— deben arraigarse en una disciplina para “no saltar a cualquier causa célebre que pueda aparecer en el mundo”, dijo él.“No estamos allí para conseguir titulares y llamar la atención. Siempre estamos dispuestos a hacer lo correcto, independientemente de si le prestan atención o no”, apuntó Hauff. “No se trata de ocasiones para fotografías; no se trata de conseguir el primer titular de las noticias vespertinas. Si lo logramos, eso es magnífico, pero… esa no es su finalidad”– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora sénior y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Dakota Access Pipeline, El respaldo a Roca Enhiesta le enseñó solidaridad a los episcopales Las lecciones van desde lo teológico hasta lo esencial y lo logístico Curate Diocese of Nebraska Standing Rock Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

‘Pilgrimage of Hope’ to raise awareness of immigrants’ plight in…

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 23, 2019 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Advocacy Peace & Justice, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC San Joaquin Bishop David Rice, left, the Rev. Anna Carmichael, the diocese’s canon to the ordinary, center, and the Rev. Nancy Key, deacon, right, take part in a Prayer of Vision, Witness and Justice — an offsite event of the 79th General Convention in July 2018 — near the T. Don Hutto Residential Center, a detention facility in Taylor, Texas, housing 500 female migrants and asylum-seekers. Photo: Cindy Smith/Diocese of San Joaquin[Episcopal News Service] Roberta Murrieta-May intends to walk at least part of the 173 miles from Fresno to Sacramento, California, because more people — especially undocumented immigrants and asylum-seekers — need hope.The Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin’s May 4-20 Pilgrimage of Hope “is a very honorable thing to do, with all the people in our culture today who don’t care about immigrants,” said Murrieta-May.Murrieta-May, 54, learned of the pilgrimage on April 10 while visiting the food bank at St. James Cathedral in Fresno, across the street from her home.“All of us are immigrants, or related to immigrants,” she said in a telephone interview with Episcopal News Service. Noting that most people in this country are descended from immigrants, she said, “More people need to care about those who are coming here because of danger, because of fear. We need to raise awareness about them.”San Joaquin Bishop David Rice said the pilgrimage, a march to raise awareness about the plight of undocumented persons and refugees, will begin May 4 after a celebration of the Eucharist and a blessing at St. James Cathedral in Fresno.From there, pilgrims will walk north approximately 17 miles per day, until they reach Sacramento, the state capital, on May 20, and join with other activists and faith groups in observance of California’s Immigrant Day of Action.“I’ll be walking every day and every mile,” said Rice. “It’s going to be a lovely outward and visible sign of what we believe. It is not only making a visible statement about what we believe and to whom we belong, but it is also about raising awareness, not only for our larger context, but raising awareness within it, too.”California’s Central Valley produces over a third of the country’s vegetables and two-thirds of its fruits and nuts, attracting undocumented farm labor.Rice said there are approximately 2.8 million undocumented immigrants in California, more than any other state.For those who are seeking a pathway to citizenship, it “is expensive, it is time-intensive and results in people living in constant fear of deportation or detention,” Rice said.He added, “When we become aware of what is going on in our larger context, when we hear the voices of the other, if we don’t respond, then we are complicit in the systems that form those voices.”Lutheran, Roman Catholic, Methodist and Episcopal congregations will offer hospitality and lodging to pilgrims along the way, and while no formal tally of participants is available, Rice hopes “others will join us.”The Rev. Terrance Goodpasture, a deacon at the Fresno cathedral and a pilgrimage organizer, said he expects partners such as Faith in the Valley to participate in the walk. Faith in the Valley, a Central California grassroots advocacy organization, is part of PICO California, the largest faith-based community organizing network in the state, with more than 485 congregational members.Some pilgrims will join for part of the walk; others will complete the entire 173 miles, he said. The pilgrims will pause at regular intervals for prayer; those who are unable to physically join the walk can pray along as well, with a booklet available for purchase on the pilgrimage website. Cost of the booklet is $10; any funds raised will go toward aiding the undocumented.The idea for the pilgrimage began to take shape in 2017, after delegates to the 58th annual diocesan convention passed a resolution to form an immigration task force, which was primarily focused on education and advocacy issues, said the Rev. Anna Carmichael, the diocese’s canon to the ordinary.“We wanted people in our pews to understand what our neighbors were going through and how we could be a resource for our neighbors,” Carmichael said. “For us, this isn’t political, it’s responding to the call to love your neighbor as yourself.“We started to build energy around immigration issues in the Central Valley.”Then came Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s November 2018 revival. Its theme, “Called to Be a Safe Place for All of God’s People,” emphasized a bold, inclusive vision of faith and love.“We focused on immigration issues and DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals),” she said, adding that the revival included a prayer walk around the cathedral’s Fresno neighborhood.Other consultations followed, with the Rev. Anthony Guillén, Episcopal Church missioner for Latino/Hispanic ministries, and with the neighboring Los Angeles diocese’s Episcopal Sacred Resistance Task Force on Immigration.Meanwhile, San Joaquin’s immigration task force had morphed into SJRAISE — San Joaquin Refugee and Immigration Support for Empowerment, and at an Advent conference, clergy and lay leaders began to dream of a pilgrimage.“One where we, along with other faith communities and friends, would walk the diocese, engaging in formation and prayer along the way, regarding the needs and concerns of our immigrant brothers and sisters,” Carmichael said.“That first day, we’re going to walk about 17 miles, and that will get us just outside Fresno,” she said. “It’s important, because this is our best attempt to make a visible and faithful expression of how we feel God is calling us. It is not meant to be political grandstanding,” she said.“This is ultimately about calling for justice so that we can fully live into our Baptismal Covenant of respecting the dignity of every human being. I see this as quite possibly one of the most important things this diocese has done since its resurrection.”(In 2008, the diocese reorganized after a breakaway group, led by a former bishop, attempted to leave The Episcopal Church. The Diocese of San Joaquin has since gained new life.)“If we don’t stand with those who are being penalized and marginalized, just because of where they were born, just because they don’t have the same kind of documentation [as I do] because I was born here, what are we all about? What is the point of proclaiming to be followers of Jesus if we aren’t living into that call?“It would almost make me feel hypocritical as a person of faith not to stand with those who are being marginalized and persecuted,” Carmichael said.Lutheran, Roman Catholic and Methodist congregations have been very enthusiastic about hosting and offering hospitality to the pilgrims. “They’ve been awesome, amazing. They’ve all been so positive and enthusiastic and really welcoming about what we’re doing,” said Goodpasture.Once the pilgrims arrive in Sacramento, Rice said they aim to engage with legislators and lawmakers concerning a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants and asylum-seekers.“This is about addressing a system that needs to be reformed,” added Rice, who in 2015 led a bicycle Tour Against Trafficking to raise awareness about human trafficking.“We are painfully aware that it is easy for politicians and for the faith community to say we’re praying for them and to let those simply be words. We need this. God needs this to be more than words. We are endeavoring to ensure that those words are about action.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Immigration AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Faith & Politics, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME ‘Pilgrimage of Hope’ to raise awareness of immigrants’ plight in California’s Central Valley San Joaquin pilgrims to reach Sacramento May 20, Day of the Immigrant Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Bryan Nelson Releases Budget Report

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Previous article10 ways to be more active during the work dayNext articleIs Tractor Supply Coming to Apopka? Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Orange County Commissioner Bryan Nelson has released the current Budget Report for his District 2 office operations.County CommissionerBryan NelsonAs of April 30, 2016, Nelson’s office is under budget by more than $48,000.The report compares Actual Expenses to the Current Budget for the operation of the office. As of the end of April 58% of the budget days have expired. Nelson’s office has spent only 41% of the budgeted amount.The total budgeted amount for Fiscal Year 2016 is $281,679. The pro-rated amount as of April 30 is $163,374. Nelson has spent only $114,599 so far.The biggest area of savings is in Personal Services. The 2016 Budgeted amount is $277,164. The pro-rated budget amount as on April 30 is $160,755. Nelson has spent only $113,774 so far.Nelson attributes the savings to the use of interns rather than hiring a budgeted full-time employee.Of the 23 line items Nelson was over budget in only one, Other Salaries and Wages. Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Save your photos on Saturday in Apopka

first_img Please enter your name here We all have old pre-digital photos around the house, right? It is time to check your closet, garage and attic because Saturday is Save Your Photos Day in Apopka!In conjunction with the Museum of the Apopkans, E-Z Photo Scan is holding a Save Your Photos Day event for Apopkans from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on September 24th at the Museum of the Apopkans.Use this link if you are not sure where the museum is located.You can have up to 100 photos (or 35mm slides), scanned for free during the event. You will also learn how to organize and preserve your treasured photos.The Save Your Photos initiative is a public service outreach campaign developed by The Association of Personal Photo Organizers (APPO) to teach individuals how they can preserve life’s irreplaceable photos, videos and documents, in case of unforeseen accident or disaster. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img TAGSMuseum of the Apopkans Previous articleDrone used to speed Apopka hospital constructionNext articleRedeveloped Errol golf course to be modern, sustainable Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Who are the Photo Organizers?The Photo Organizers are a community of independent business owners who offer a vast knowledge of information on photo creation, organization and management services. The services can range from helping clients organize their varies photo collections to scanning old photos to large projects of cataloging a life’s worth of photos and everything in-between.E-Z Photo Scan, the leading marketer of desktop photo-scanning systems and a proud sponsor of the Save Your Photos Alliance, reminds everyone the 3rd Annual International Save Your Photos Month is September 2016. The month-long celebration of family history and stories offers numerous events to learn how to preserve photos and documents for posterity.“In the three years of annual Save Your Photos activities, nearly 200,000 images have been preserved at these events,” says Richard “Rick“ Lippert, president, E-Z Photo Scan. “From natural disasters to negligence, family photos are being lost to future generations. The Save Your Photos Alliance is dedicated to raising awareness of the problem.”Lippert adds the need to preserve family photos goes beyond simply scanning old photos. Today’s consumers are capturing more personal photos than ever, and these photos also need to be preserved.“InfoTrends estimates 1.2 trillion pictures will be taken worldwide this year,” explains Lippert. “Many families don’t think about preserving those pictures now, for the benefit of families and for future generations. Without a print, it’s important for every family to set aside time to back up and to preserve family photos. That off-the-cuff selfie on your daughter’s iPhone could be a treasured memory in a few years. If that image is not backed up, that’s an irreplaceable loss.” You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

In case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Eight stories that shaped Apopka this week:Red light camera hearings a tough gauntlet to runThe race for Apopka Mayor beginsNelson makes his candidacy for mayor officialMayor Kilsheimer: “We created more than 1,000 jobs in the projects we approved”Arbor Bend begins a new era in South ApopkaBreaking News: Anuvia resumes operations without using Apopka plantHow I met Charlie DanielsBreaking down walls in the town of Apopka TAGSWeek in Review Previous articleDonna’s Deals: Tax Season Software DealsNext articleShould Markeith Loyd face the Death Penalty? Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment!last_img read more